Elevation Zero


When it comes to climate change, one thing is certain: our oceans are rising. And South Florida is expected to be among the first regions on Earth to experience the impact. In fact, some initial preparations are already underway

WLRN-Miami Herald News presents a series of stories about the effects of sea-level rise. The project is called “Elevation Zero: Rising Seas In South Florida."

Click through the pages below to see our entire archive of Elevation Zero stories, or listen to these special one-hour programs aired during our week of sea-level rise coverage, Nov. 11-15, 2013:

The Sunshine Economy: Underwater Real Estate

Alex Chadwick's "BURN: An Energy Journal"

Elevation Zero town hall, hosted by WLRN's Tom Hudson

Select Elevation Zero features: "Rising Seas In South Florida"

The Florida Roundup: Sea-Level Rise Will Flood South Florida. Now What?

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

A wave of high tides is expected to hit much of the East Coast this week. These special tides — king tides — occur a few times a year when the moon's orbit brings it close to the Earth.

But scientists say that lately, even normal tides throughout the year are pushing water higher up onto land. And that's causing headaches for people who live along coastlines.

As Bob Dylan might have put it, the tides, they are a changin'.

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

Arianna Prothero / WLRN

Another King Tide will wash over South Florida on Oct. 9.

That’s the alignment of the Earth, sun and moon in a way that gives us the highest tides of the year. And this one will bring an opportunity for local students who are really serious about climate change and sea-level rise to glimpse and document coastal Florida’s possible future.

Map Shows Cities Their Climate Change Futures

Aug 10, 2014

By the time the 22nd Century rolls around, summers in Miami will be about six degrees hotter -- as hot as summers already are in south Texas.

That's what we learn from a new interactive map that's showing up on climate-change web sites. Just type in where you live now and the map will lead you to a city that has the same weather now as your city will have in 86 years.

Carla Javier/WLRN

Gov. Rick Scott has been repeatedly quoted as saying "I'm not a scientist" when asked whether he believes in man-made climate change.

Listen: Does South Florida's Water Taste Funny?

Jun 10, 2014
Cyndi Calhoun / Creative Commons/Flickr

How would you describe the flavor of water? The ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle said it "tends to be tasteless." But you probably didn't feel that way when you tried the tap water outside your hometown. Why does water taste so different within the U.S., even within your own state?

US Geological Survey

A study finds that South Florida maybe can’t blame the rest of the world for saltwater seeping into the groundwater, also called saltwater intrusion. 

The White House is painting a dire picture for every region in the nation, especially South Florida, if action isn't taken to combat climate change. Some states' Republican lawmakers still are not buying it.

Things won't be pretty in South Florida if the latest White House climate assessment is right. You can expect intensified storms and a sea that will keep steadily encroaching on your way of life slowly nipping away at that shore your toes used to trust.

Florida House of Representatives

State Senate President Don Gaetz likes to introduce House Speaker Will Weatherford as the “taller, smarter, better-looking version of the Weatherford-Gaetz” duo. Their alliance has led to the quick passage of legislation like last year's ethics reform package and this year's sex offender bills. But on several education bills, the two diverge.