Erika Dissolves

The remnants of Tropical Storm Erika could still cause heavy rains in Florida in the coming days.

Croqueta Preparadas

Aug 29, 2015

  Gas up the 'Word On Food Mobile' Sherman!

Thousands of Florida families could face increased out-of-pocket health care expenses starting October 1.

Weather Underground

Around South Florida,  some residents are cautiously preparing for Erika.

It’s not yet clear if Erika will be a full blown hurricane or a lesser storm  that will impact South Florida.

Michael Amend of Miami Beach was stocking up on water at Home Depot in North  Miami -- just in case.

"I think you have to take it seriously and wait and see how it develops," he said. 

Angie Bryan who lives in Miami Shores, said she was making sure she had extra cannisters of propane. In case of a power outage, she plans to fire up her grill to cook.

C.M. Guerrero / El Nuevo Herald

With Tropical Storm Erika on a course to barrel into Florida, Gov. Rick Scott on Friday declared a state of emergency for the entire state.

The executive order pointed to updated forecasts from the National Hurricane Center indicating the storm likely will "travel up the spine of Florida's peninsula." Erika is now expected to remain a tropical storm, rather than turn into a more-powerful hurricane.

(This post was last updated at 12:30 p.m. ET.)

After dumping heavy rain on the tiny island of Dominica, Tropical Storm Erika is now forecast to continue its northwestern track, hit Hispaniola and eventually pose a threat to Florida.

By late morning, Florida Gov. Rick Scott declared a state of emergency.

Updated at 11:05 p.m. ET

Tropical Storm Erika has caused extensive flooding and landslides on the eastern Caribbean island of Dominica, killing at least four people and cutting power and water to many residents.

The storm dumped 9 inches of rain on the mountainous island late Wednesday.

"The situation is grim. It is dangerous," Ian Pinard, Dominica's communications minister, was quoted by The Associated Press as saying.

Creative Commons

With a large aging population, Florida is an epicenter of Alzheimer’s cases in the United States. Roughly half a million people in the state live with the disease and by 2025, that number is projected to increase by 44 percent.

Mount Sinai Medical Center in Miami Beach and University of Florida Health just got 1.5 million in funding from the National Institutes of Health to run the only full-time Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center in the state to try and combat these numbers.

Nadege Green / WLRN

This is a story about a mermaid.

A vigilante-environmentalist mermaid, and she can't stay quiet any longer. She needs people to stop polluting South Florida’s waters.

“She’s the daughter of the goddess of the sea known as Yemaya in Cuba and the Caribbean,” says Elizabeth Doud.

In her one-woman show, Doud transforms into Siren Jones, the mermaid.

Mike Echevarria / Florida Aquarium

Submerged 250 to 300 feet in the Gulf of Mexico lies a coral reef that could hold the key to crucial information and resources for the Florida Keys reef. 

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration research cruise is currently operating at Pulley Ridge, 100 miles west of Key West, where scientists are using a remotely operated vehicle to collect videos and samples from the sea floor.

Tropical Storm Erika Growing Stronger

Aug 27, 2015

  The Florida Emergency Operations Center is under what it calls Level Two preparations as Tropical Storm Erika spins toward the Caribbean Islands.

The partial activation of the State Emergency Response Team means emergency officials are urging residents to get ready just in case.

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