Education

Florida has chosen a follower of Jeb Bush education theory from Indiana to be its next education commissioner.

Tony Bennett is serving out his term as Indiana's superintendent of public instruction after a re-election defeat.  In Florida, he'll replace Gerard Robinson, who resigned months ago after only a year in office.

NEWSCAST: Former Indiana Education Chief Applies Here

Dec 3, 2012
eric.bradner

  

  Indiana's ousted education chief says he's applied for the Sunshine State's top schools job.

Tony Bennett lost his bid for reelection last month.

Bennett says he first met Jeb Bush after winning election as the Indiana's Superintendent of Public Instruction four years ago.

Since then, Bennett has taken education policies Bush first in Florida tried and brought them to Indiana. Those ideas are often called "The Florida Model."

World Affairs Council of Philadelphia/Flickr

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush has been riding a wave of popularity in the last few years. Members of the Republican Party have been clamoring for him to seek higher office as he travels around the country taking on some of the more extreme positions recently taken by members of his party.

Among his credentials, which are currently prompting all the focus, is his popularity with the Latino community and his credentials as a successful education policy innovator.

JaxStrong /Flickr

Gov. Rick Scott issued a challenge to colleges all over the state asking them to find a way to offer a bachelor's degree program that costs no more than $10,000 for all four years.

edline.net

One of Palm Beach County's oldest public schools is hoping to become one of Florida's greenest.

Kyle Stokes / StateImpact Indiana

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush suffered long-distance electoral defeats in Indiana and Idaho on Tuesday.

In Indiana, the state's top education official -- a Bush ally and top lieutenant in his education foundation -- was defeated by a Democratic challenger. And, in Idaho, voters repealed three controversial education laws that bore the Bush seal of approval.

KAETIDH / FLICKR

 

Saudi Arabia and South Korea are among the top 5 leading places of origin for international college and university students in Florida.

That's according to the Institute for International Education, which released its Open Doors fact sheet today.

It reports that during the 2011-12 school year, 32,567 students from other countries enrolled for the first time in a Florida college or university. 

What A Makeover For Miami-Dade Schools Will Look Like

Nov 8, 2012
jphilipg / FLICKR

Miami-Dade voters have approved a $1.2 billion bond referendum to improve public school infrastructure and access to technology.

Schools Superintendent Alberto Carvalho proposed the measure back in August.

Carvalho has said the bond would establish a "technology baseline" for Miami-Dade schools—so that all schools have at least a minimum number of computers, for example. 

Pamela

Just what led to some voting breakdowns in Miami-Dade is still up for debate - not enough resources, too many voters, too long a ballot, too many precincts in one place. About the only thing certain is it will be at least one more day before we know who can claim Florida.One man who is happy with the election results and is Miami-Dade School Superintendent Alberto Carvalho. Voters overwhelmingly approved the $1.2 billion dollar bond referendum to refurbish aging school buildings and also update and install new technology. 

Under a higher education plan now developing in Florida, you’d pay a lot more for a standard liberal arts degree than for one in science or the technologies.

It's Gov. Rick Scott's way of encouraging people to study for high-demand, economy-building careers.

Gina Jordan / StateImpact Florida

Under new federal dietary rules, kids in school cafeteria lunch lines will be required to accept a serving of fruit or vegetables. But since there is no corresponding federal power to make them eat it, it’s likely many students will soon be defying their government at lunchtime.

StateImpact education reporter Gina Jordan has been sampling the student opinion of broccoli and peas and stuff:

“I hate them.”

“They’re disgusting.”

Flickr/DonkeyHotey

Forget booths and absentee ballots.

College students would rather vote using their thumbs, according to a study conducted by telecommunications giant AT&T.

AT&T conducted the survey on one of the most politically galvanized campuses in the nation -- Lynn University in Boca Raton.  American politics have played a major role at Lynn since last fall, when the university was chosen to host the last Presidential debate of 2012.

Out of nearly 300 students surveyed, 58 percent say they would use smartphones to cast their ballot if "mobile voting" were available.

Jamesnaruke/flickr

Gov. Rick Scott wants the State Board of Education to change its plan to set passing scores based on a student’s race. But he isn’t saying what the board should do to alter the plan.

Every child should be performing on grade level in subjects like math and reading, Scott says. “I mean, I learn differently than other people learn, but I do know that all children can learn,” Scott says, “and we should expect we should have high standards for everybody.”

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