Education

via www.drstevegallon.com

The first wave of university students displaced by Hurricane Maria has arrived to study in the mainland US, taking advantage of tuition discounts offered to Puerto Rican students whose home institutions remain shuttered.

“Coming here was a big relief,” says Rosamari Palerm, 23. She was the first student from Puerto Rico to arrive at St. Thomas University, a private Catholic school in Miami Gardens, Florida with over 5,000 students.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Latoya Williams was concerned about her first paycheck after Hurricane Irma.

She couldn’t go to work for seven days because the early childcare center where she teaches was closed because of the storm and its after-effects.

“Whatever I make is what I make,” said Williams. “I have no supplemental income. It really would have been hard and tight."

Like most hourly employees, Williams doesn’t get paid if she doesn’t show up to work— even if the reason is an act of nature. The economic impact of Irma could have a devastating affect on individuals who work hourly jobs.

Eight South Florida Schools To Get Extra $2K Per Student

Oct 18, 2017
Miami Herald

Eight of South Florida’s most struggling schools will get a multi-million dollar boost over the next two years to offer social services like mental health care.

The state Board of Education on Wednesday awarded an extra $2,000 per student to 11 schools statewide, including five in Miami-Dade County and three in Palm Beach County. The awards are for the 2017-18 and 2018-19 school years.

Lindsey Kilbride

Broward County and a dozen other school districts filed a much-anticipated lawsuit targeting House Bill 7069 on Monday.

Peter Haden / WLRN

Gov. Rick Scott wants to spend more money on enhancing security at Jewish schools next year following a spate of bomb threats and anti-Semitic hate crimes.

But his plan has attracted criticism from civil rights groups and representatives of other religions who argue it’s too narrow and exclusionary.

Caitie Switalski / WLRN News

It was an unusual night at South Plantation High School Thursday. Plenty of kids stayed late for football practice and club meetings, but some also stayed for the chance to ask their superintendent to make changes in their education. 

Robert Runcie, superintendent of Broward County Schools,  and Laurie Rich Levinson, school board member for District 6, were on deck at a student-run forum to explain how they make decisions.

The University of Florida's president is urging students to stay away from a speaking event on campus featuring white nationalist Richard Spencer.

Senate Pushes To Expand Bright Futures Scholarship

Oct 10, 2017
Miami Herald

An additional 44,000 Bright Futures students would have their scholarships expanded under a bill approved Monday by the Senate Education Committee.

The legislation (SB 4), sponsored by Sen. Bill Galvano, R-Bradenton, would increase scholarship coverage for “medallion scholars” in state universities from the current $77 per credit hour to $159, or roughly 75 percent of the cost of tuition and fees.

Patrick Farrell / Miami Herald

Miami-Dade County Public Schools wants to push back state testing after the district lost seven days of instruction to Hurricane Irma.

In a letter to Education Commissioner Pam Stewart, Superintendent Alberto Carvalho asked if the district could get an extra week before state English language arts and math tests take place this spring. (Read the letter below.)

Photo from Miami Dade College's Facebook page

Puerto Rican students who were displaced by Hurricane Maria will soon be able to continue their studies in South Florida — at a discount.

This week Gov. Rick Scott asked public colleges and universities to offer in-state tuition rates to Puerto Ricans affected by the storm. Many schools responded — and some are going further by extending the offer to people from other places affected by recent natural disasters. And private schools are pitching in, too.

New federal guidelines for handling allegations of sexual assault are prompting a range of reactions from school administrators. While many are expressing concerns and vowing to maintain current policy, others are breathing a sigh of relief or scratching their heads in confusion.

StateImpact Florida / WLRN

South Florida has the highest concentration of segregated public schools in the state, according to a new study out Wednesday.

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

The cafeteria at Horace O'Bryant School in Key West was once again a cacophony of voices  Wednesday as students at the elementary and middle school returned to their classrooms for the first time since Hurricane Irma.

Out front, Principal Christina McPherson was greeting students and the parents dropping them off.

"We're welcoming back 1,100 students into the building, and we're anxious to start the day and get everybody back to a new normal," McPherson said.

She said the full student body was returning — along with a few additions.

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