Arts & Culture

Imagine having one of the worst days of your professional life play out in front of 5 million people.

ABC News anchor Dan Harris doesn't have to. In 2004, he had a panic attack on live TV after years of working in war zones and using drugs to cope with the stress. But that mortifying moment led him to take up meditation.

In the 1970s, William Eggleston shocked the New York art world when the Museum of Modern Art exhibited his color photographs (Until then, most
serious photography had been black and white). Eggleston's pictures of the everyday established color photography and turned him into an art star. At the age of 78, the Memphis native surprised people yet again by releasing his first body of original music last October, an album titled Musik.

More than fifty years after her death, a new work by Zora Neale Hurston will hit the presses. Barracoon is her account of the last known survivor of America’s Transatlantic slave trade. The Florida anthropologist and author is known for her celebration of black life and culture in the rural South. This latest manuscript will reinforce that legacy.

Miami Herald

Florida lawmakers are making final preparations for the 2018 legislative session, which is set to begin Tuesday,  Jan. 9. There will be a lot on the docket for both chambers, but there's no question that this session will take place under the dark cloud of sexual harassment controversies. A couple seats are empty from lawmakers who resigned after being embroiled in such cases. 

The audio link above includes an excerpt of Terry Gross' 1989 conversation with Sue Grafton.

I think the last time I reviewed one of Sue Grafton's novels was in 2009. I wrote that U is for Undertow was so good, "it makes me wish there were more than 26 letters at her disposal." Now, of course, that line falls flat.

British neuroscientist Joseph Jebelli first set out to study Alzheimer's because of his grandfather, who developed the disease when Jebelli was 12.

In the years that followed, Jebelli watched as his grandfather's memory started to disappear. But Jebelli points out that although a certain amount of memory loss is a natural part of aging, what happened to his grandfather and to other Alzheimer's patients is different.

Revisiting our favorite books from adolescence is a tricky thing. These are, after all, novels we bonded with during a very impressionable time in our lives. As with our first romantic loves, we're often not willing or even able to see their faults. Even in hindsight, our judgment is colored — by nostalgia, by comfort, by the sense that these books are old friends.

Sue Grafton, the author of A Is For Alibi and 24 other mysteries featuring detective Kinsey Millhone, died Thursday at age 77. Her daughter Jamie wrote on Facebook that her mother had been battling cancer for the past two years but had been doing well until recent days.

Teresa Frontado / WLRN

WLRN News does not have a book critic on staff. We’re a relatively small shop and we’re busy — reporting, editing and producing stories about South Florida for the radio and the web.

But many of us are readers in our off hours. So, this year a few of us shared the books we read that we’ll carry with us.

Odalis Garcia / WLRN News

In an empty lot near the corner of 23rd Street and North Miami Avenue in Wynwood there’s a giant statue of a man carrying a fish on his back. A few feet away there are smaller human-like sculptures arranged in a circle facing a pyramid, a sphere and a cube.

The molds for these sculptures have made the long journey from Mexico hoping that, as they are created, these pieces of art ignite conversations about how to deal with sea level rise. 

American museum-goers can now get a rare glimpse of a painting that's been called a masterpiece — but has spent most of its life in storage. When The Fulbright Triptych was first shown in 1975, its future looked bright, but it didn't work out that way. It's a massive work — nearly 14 feet wide — with near life-sized portraits of the artist, Simon Dinnerstein, and his family.

Looking for a few great reads to give as gifts this holiday season?

Here & Now‘s Robin Young gets a few picks for great reads to give this holiday season from Petra Mayer (@petramatic) of NPR Books.

Petra Mayer’s Recommendations

Nonfiction

Music has long been used as a vehicle to drive social awareness forward. Artists like Bob Marley and Gil Scott-Heron tackled political issues head-on in their lyrics and used their voices to speak for the forgotten, marginalized people. Such artists are found in all corners of the world.

In Haiti, Joseph Emmanuel “Manno” Charlemagne followed this tradition fervently, writing songs about Haitian politics and the circumstances of his countrymen. Charlemagne died Sunday, Dec. 10, in a Miami Beach hospital where he was being treated for cancer.      

Gerard Allon

Among lovers of literature, if the name Itzik Manger doesn't ring the same bells as Sholem Aleichem or Isaac Bashevis Singer, Avi Hoffman wants to change that.

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