Arts & Culture

Michael Loretta / shop.mikebusiness.com

In the upcoming action-comedy "Pixels," classic video game characters such as Pac Man and Donkey Kong attempt to take over the world.

These 1980s characters also run amok in Michael Loretta’s digital art. He inserts two-dimensional figures from similar video game titles into high-resolution photos of Miami.

 

BEACH CRUISER

Mark Stein / WLRN

This week, the Society for Crypto-Judaic Studies hosts its 25th annual conference here in Miami. The society aims to study the history of Jewish communities persecuted during the Spanish Inquisition of the 14th and 15th centuries.

Ernest Hemingway Collection. John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston

Key West was home to many famous American writers, but the most well known is Ernest Hemingway.

More than 50 years after his death, hundreds flock to the writer's old hometown near the end of July for the annual Hemingway Days festival. It begins Tuesday, July 21, on the 116th anniversary of his birthday.

Alexander Gonzalez / WLRN

The artwork at Locust Projects Gallery in the Design District plays with Miami stereotypes.

A palm tree smelling of coconut oil rests on a hammock. In the corner, the static of a television set resembles the sound of waves crashing on the shore. Opposite that lie deconstructed items taken from a strip club.

Twenty high school students made these and other works as part of the sixth-annual summer program, Locust Art Builders or LAB. LAB allows young artists from Miami-Dade County to create their own exhibition, which opened July 11.

Nadege Greeb / WLRN

Every time the young dancers at Be Dance Studios in Miami Gardens walk into class, they see a framed photo of ballerina Michaela DePrince leaping into the air hanging on the wall above the ballet barres.

But on this day, DePrince is here in person, teaching them.

DePrince is a former principal dancer with the Dance Theater of Harlem. Now she’s with the Dutch National Ballet in Amsterdam, where she’s the only black ballerina in the company.

She walks the dancers though a warm up exercise at the ballet barre.

Arthur Rothstein / Arthur Rothstein Archive

Arthur Rothstein was a young man in the 1930s. He originally wanted to be a doctor. But it was the Depression and he went to work for the Farm Security Administration, documenting American workers and the conditions they faced.

In 1938, that assignment took him to Key West. The city suffered more than most in the Depression, declaring bankruptcy and essentially handing itself over to the state. The state, in turn, brought in a New Deal administrator who decided the island should remake itself as a tourist mecca.

Screenshot from Netflix

The Wolfsonian-FIU Museum's newest exhibit chronicles an arts enterprise at Tulane University's former women's college. From 1895 to 1940, students sold pottery, embroidery and jewelry made in the program.

In the spirit of the Newcomb Pottery Enterprise, the Wolfsonian is launching a month-long women’s film series, titled “Leading Ladies.” Each Friday in August at 7 p.m., the museum will screen classic movies starring women.

Here’s the lineup:

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