Arts & Culture

More than a year ago, the world first heard the official cast recording of the most successful Broadway musical in recent memory. The album would ultimately go double-platinum and top Billboard's rap chart, owing in part to fired-up fans hitting repeat, memorizing lyrics and absorbing the show's richly textured world.

National polls show that it's a tight race between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. A west Tampa bakery has a presidential poll of its own. 

Alessi Bakery, which has been in Tampa since 1912, has had this cookie poll since 2004. 

Peter Haden / WLRN

Gordon Oliver “Ollie” Wareham says all of his songs tell a story.

Is it the dessert topping that eats like a spread, or the spread that can also be a dessert topping? That's a question the U.S. government is asking about Nutella, the chocolate and hazelnut treat, in a new request for comments. The answer could cut the number of calories and fat listed on Nutella's nutritional labels in half.

Family of Larry Rosen

Larry Rosen was always looking for his next big project. A decade ago, he'd recently finished producing a series for PBS, "Legends of Jazz with Ramsey Lewis," but he was not a guy interested in taking a break. The Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts was new and, as usual, Rosen saw an opportunity: bring jazz to the gleaming new concert hall, one with acoustics that could be adjusted to different kinds of music. 

Konpa music has dominated the Haitian music industry for decades. But while the genre’s roots are firmly in Haiti, today its leading bands are often not. This year, the top two albums came from bands right here in Miami, which many now consider the “capitol of konpa.”

David Bornfriend / Courtesy of A24

This interview was originally published on October 26, 2016. 

When director Barry Jenkins was looking for ideas for a new film, his friends at the Borsht Film Festival thought of the work of another Miami native, the playwright  (and MacArthur Genius) Tarell Alvin McCraney.

When scientists want to know what our ancient ancestors ate, they can look at a few things: fossilized animal bones with marks from tools used to butcher and cut them; fossilized poop; and teeth. The first two can tell us a lot, but they're hard to come by in the fossil record. Thankfully, there are a lot of teeth to fill in the gaps.

It's one thing to appreciate a 20-year-old fine wine. It is something else to brew up a 2,500-year-old alcoholic beverage.

While sifting through the remains of an Iron Age burial plot dating from 400 to 450 B.C. in what is today Germany, Bettina Arnold, an archaeologist and anthropologist at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and others uncovered a cauldron that contained remnants of an alcohol brewed and buried with the deceased.

David G. Zuckerman

This morning, I woke up to vindication. It came in the form of a news alert on my phone telling me that Bob Dylan is now a Nobel Prize winner in literature. Not that I needed vindication so many years after the incident at my high school graduation. OK, maybe I did because I immediately wondered if the early 1990s-era administration of Minisink Valley High School in New York State got the same alert.

jlacpo / Flicker

It was in a Miami Beach High School classroom in 1974 that I first heard the name Bob Dylan. The teacher thought that Dylan's “Like A Rolling Stone,” written some 10 years before, was important enough in the evolution of pop culture to share with a bunch of 15-year-olds.

Bruce Springsteen also heard “Like a Rolling Stone” at age 15 and remembers: “I knew I was listening to the toughest voice that I had ever heard. It was lean and it sounded somehow simultaneously young and adult…It make me feel kind of irresponsibly innocent. It freed your mind the way Elvis freed your body”

Bob Dylan has won the 2016 Nobel Prize in literature. The prolific musician is the first Nobel winner to have forged a career primarily as a singer-songwriter. What's more, he's also the first American to have won the prize in more than two decades. Not since novelist Toni Morrison won in 1993 has an American claimed the prize.

Luigi Guarino / Flickr Creative Commons

Plantain. It’s a South Florida food staple. It’s green, it’s starchy and when cooked absolutely delicious.  No arguments there.

But how do you pronounce it?

I was going over a radio script with my editor Tom Hudson and when we got to the word he called it “plan-TAYNE,” rhymes with rain. I said,  “plan-TIN,” like inn.

I’ve always heard it pronounced both ways in Miami, but is there a “right" way?

In the 1960s, the sugar industry funded research that downplayed the risks of sugar and highlighted the hazards of fat, according to a newly published article in JAMA Internal Medicine.

thehungryblackman.com

Miami blogger Starex Smith is exploring local food scenes from the perspective of a hungry black man.

His blog The Hungry Black Man is a mix of restaurant recommendations and profiles of food entrepreneurs across Florida and other states he visits.

But since Smith's home base is Miami, South Florida gets a lot of love on the blog.  

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