Arts & Culture

If the popularity of quinoa has taught us anything, it's that Americans are increasingly open about exploring grains besides the familiar wheat and rice. Now, researchers at Tennessee State University are hoping consumers are ready to give another ancient grain a try: amaranth. Amaranth was revered by the Aztecs in Mexico. Today in the U.S., it's mostly grown in people's backyards or on research farms, like an experimental field at Tennessee State University. Some of the amaranth there looks...

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

Key West has a great restaurant scene — but people who live on the island know that to get true local delicacies you have to get inside someone's kitchen. Preferably someone who was born in the Keys, or a Conch in local parlance. Someone like Martin Liz. He was born and raised on the island and he knows how to handle a conch filet. "The tough part of the conch is the exterior part," Liz said, while he prepared conch salad from a recipe he learned in the Bahamas at his Lost Kitchen Supper Club...

It’s not exactly something you’d expect to see hanging in the Louvre. A very unusual art exhibit is on display at the University of North Florida Gallery of Art. “Ink, Icons, Identity: Exploring U2’s Brand Through Fan Tattoos” is a multimedia project that examines the personal experiences of U2 fans and their relationship with the Irish rock band. UNF Assistant Professor of graphic design and digital media Beth Nabi is curator of the exhibit. She is a big fan of U2 but does not display any...

Nevermore Production Films

If you're going to craft a good horror story, a gloomy climate almost always helps. The Overlook Hotel in The Shining probably wouldn't be as scary without that isolating snow storm. Nor would Edgar Allen Poe's House of Usher seem as foreboding surrounded by palm trees inside of all the miasmic fog. So can a top-notch horror movie ever be set in sunny South Florida?

We're living at a time when more than 80 percent of Americans fail to eat the recommended amounts of fruits and vegetables. At the same time, many Americans overeat refined grains and sugar. This may help explain why the obesity rate seems stuck. The most recent estimate is that 36 percent of adults in the U.S. are obese. But, as a nation, we seem to have our blinders on. Despite much evidence to the contrary, most Americans say they have a healthy diet. This comes from a poll NPR conducted...

The 2,200-year-old mummy of an Egyptian man who spent a lot of time sitting and eating carbs went on display at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem on Tuesday and will be open to the public beginning Wednesday. Alex, as he is called by the researchers who study him, was a 5-foot-6-inch Egyptian priest who spent most of his time sitting, according to his osteoporosis-weakened skeleton, which has shrunk to just over 5 feet over the more than two millennia he spent embalmed, according to The Times of...

The table is set for dinner. Small cooked crabs and shrimp are laid out on the thick wooden tabletop next to succulent figs, grapes, pears and types of produce you can't even name. There's a citrus with a long coiling peel draped around it, and an entire roast of some animal's leg that's been cut down the middle — so you can see the thick layer of fat running around the edge. Just for good measure, a red lobster and ornate goblet of wine stand on a pedestal above it. If this meal were laid...

In April 1865, at the bloody, bitter end of the Civil War, Ebenezer Nelson Gilpin, a Union cavalryman, wrote in his diary, "Everything is chaos here. The suspense is almost unbearable." "We are reduced to quarter rations and no coffee," he continued. "And nobody can soldier without coffee." If war is hell, then for many soldiers throughout American history, it is coffee that has offered some small salvation. Hidden Kitchens looks at three American wars through the lens of coffee: the Civil...

Note: This story first ran last summer. The group Mangoes to Share is back at it this summer, and they say they've been scheduling "non-stop" pickups. Organizer Anna Milaeva tells us the owner of one vacant lot has given them carte blanche to pick mangoes from 30 trees on the property. They've been picking other fruit too, like star fruit, lychees and avocados. Now they're looking for more places to donate to throughout South Florida, and would especially love to hear from smaller pantries...

Just a week before a Vermont law kicks in requiring labels on food containing genetically modified ingredients, U.S. Senate agriculture leaders announced a deal Thursday that takes the power out of states' hands — and sets a mandatory national system for GM disclosures on food products. Sen. Pat Roberts, R-Kansas, the chairman of the U.S. Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry, unveiled the plan that had been negotiated for weeks with U.S. Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Michigan....

One of my fondest childhood memories is of eating tomatoes. We picked them in the garden and ate them in sandwiches, sitting on a picnic table under the trees outside our house. That juicy, acidic taste is forever lodged in the pleasure centers of my brain. For anyone with similar memories, supermarket tomatoes are bound to disappoint. Indeed, the classic supermarket tomato — hard, tasteless, sometimes mealy — has inspired countless bitter complaints. Take a closer look at the tomato display...

Lynnette Cantos

At the beginning of each performance, Speakfridays host and founder Robert Lee starts by reciting to newcomers and regulars alike the night’s catchphrase: “Can I speak?,” Lee shouts. And the audience responds with a resounding, “Yes you can.” Started in 2006, Speakfridays has been a staple of Miami’s underground art and culture scene for the last 10 years. Originally located in a warehouse in the Bird Road Arts district, the show moved to Wynwood last year in search of larger accommodations. ...

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