Arts & Culture

http://blogs.herald.com/scene_in_the_tropics/

08/02/12 - In the second half of the program, Linda Gassenheimer with Miami Herald columnist Lesley Abravenel. She’ll give an update on the South Florida social and restaurant scene. Plus, wine columnist Fred Tasker.  That’s Topical Currents . .

Arts Garage

On any given weekend, you might walk by The Old School Square parking garage in Delray Beach and hear the sounds of jazz or blues or classical music wafting from the ground floor.

It’s an innovative venue known as the 'Arts Garage' and, yes, the rest of the building is actually devoted to cradling cars.

But the ground floor is where all the action is.

No vehicles there, no take-a-ticket machines, no yellow lines, no parking attendants to be seen, mostly live music in a 5500 square foot garage.

Christine DiMattei

The disco craze that took the world by storm nearly 40 years ago was born in New York City, right?

Maybe not.

A theatrical experience celebrating 1970's disco comes to the Adrienne Arsht Center tonight.  And while it’s hundreds of miles away from the streets John Travolta struts down in “Saturday Night Fever,” it turns out Miami played a major role in the disco craze.

Salsa Lessons

May 17, 2012
Laura Isensee

Music teacher Mario Ortiz has been teaching classic salsa tunes to elementary and middle school students for 14 years.  Outside the classroom, Mario plays trumpet in a salsa group. He learned music from his father, who was also named Mario Ortiz.

The elder Ortiz was a well known salsa bandleader (for the Mario Ortiz All Star Band)  in Puerto Rico in the 1960s.  He died in 1999.

Taking The Plunge

May 9, 2012
Alicia Zuckerman

UPDATE  June 6, 2013 14:43 p.m.: (AP) Esther Williams, the swimming champion turned actress who starred in glittering and aquatic Technicolor musicals of the 1940s and 1950s, has died. She was 91.

Williams died early Thursday in her sleep, according to her longtime publicist Harlan Boll.

Following in the footsteps of Sonja Henie, who went from skating champion to movie star, Williams became one of Hollywood's biggest moneymakers, appearing in spectacular swimsuit numbers that capitalized on her wholesome beauty and perfect figure.

 

After an incursion by the upstart Miami Cuban community, the people have spoken – Tampa is the true home of the Cuban sandwich.

More than 7,200 people voted at the NPR food blog, “The Salt,” and the results speak for themselves: 57 percent for Tampa, 43 percent for Miami as the true home of the Cuban sandwich.

Marice Cohn Band / The Miami Herald

Ruth Greenfield was a music teacher and a maverick. In the segregated 1950s and 60s, she ran a Miami arts school that included students and teachers from all racial backgrounds–even if she had to teach in a Masonic lodge or in a funeral home.  She came from a privileged background and was able to study music in Paris, where people of all kinds interacted more freely.

 

Marice Cohn Band / The Miami Herald

 Ruth Greenfield was a music teacher and a maverick. In the segregated 1950s and 60s, she ran a Miami arts school that included students and teachers from all racial backgrounds–even if she had to teach in a Masonic lodge or in a funeral home.  She came from a privileged background and was able to study music in Paris, where people of all kinds interacted more freely.

 

Marice Cohn Band / The Miami Herald

Ruth Greenfield was a music teacher and a maverick. In the segregated 1950s and 60s, she ran a Miami arts school that included students and teachers from all racial backgrounds–even if she had to teach in a Masonic lodge or in a funeral home.  

She came from a privileged background and was able to study music in Paris, where people of all kinds interacted more freely.

Carl Juste / Miami Herald

On an icy night in late December, Miami native Robert Battle, the new artistic director of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, saw his past and future come together in the heart of New York City.

After a year and a half of public grooming, of working alongside his towering predecessor, Judith Jamison, Battle was finally at the head of modern dance's most famous company, and in programming the troupe's annual five-week season at City Center Theatre, a major event in the New York dance world, he had made his real debut as director.

Yucel Tellici/stock.xchang

Diana Abu-Jaber read her essay for Under the Sun about her family’s heritage of hosting guests during the holidays.  Here are a few recipes you might want to add to your holiday table.  One is more elaborate–perhaps for a host to serve.  The other is super simple–perhaps something a guest can contribute to a party.  These recipes are from Abu-Jaber’s memoir, The Language of Baklava (Pantheon Books).

POETIC BAKLAVA

Diana Abu-Jaber On Sharing The Table During The Holidays

Dec 14, 2011
Diana Abu-Jaber

For many of us, cooking for a holiday feast or making preparations for a party are well worn and beloved holiday routines.  All of that hosting can also be exhausting!  Listen to author Diana Abu-Jaber read her essay on her family’s heritage of hosting guests during the holidays.

An Excerpt From The Hatmakers And The Heron Master

Oct 19, 2011
Trina Sargalski

Michael Keller is the author of a graphic novel adaptation of Charles Darwin’s Origin of Species. He is working on a historical novel, The Hatmakers and the Heron Master, about hat-makers, wading birds and Florida’s early settlement. Below is an excerpt from his latest book:

1893.

Muralist Makes His Mark In Little Haiti

Sep 14, 2011
Trina Sargalski

If you’ve ever visited Little Haiti, you’ve probably seen Miami muralist Serge Toussaint’s work, which is sprinkled throughout the city. How can you tell it’s his work? His signature is a dollar sign instead of an “S” in Serge. He spends most of his time in Little Haiti, but his work can be seen in Liberty City, Little River, Allapattah, the Miami River and all the way to Fort Lauderdale.

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