Arts & Culture

Simon Cocks / flickr

What are you reading? WLRN wants to know — and we'll share what we, and other people in the South Florida community, are reading every week in this space.

Tell us what you're reading by replying in the comments, or tweet us @WLRN with the hashtag #FridayReads .

Pablo Cartaya, author of The Epic Fail of Arturo Zamora

Arturo Zamora is 13 and ready for a relaxing summer. His plans are quickly shattered when his family's business is threatened by a developer,  he loses one of the most important people in his life and he has to find the courage to express his feelings to a girl who has swept him off his feet. 

This is the plot of a new children's middle grade novel out now, the ‘Epic Fail of Arturo Zamora,’ by Pablo Cartaya. We spoke with Cartaya about the experiences he had growing up that inspired much of the story.

Grove Atlantic

Patricia Engel has the extremely familiar story of having come to Miami for what she thought would be a year -- 13 years ago.

Courtsey HistoryMiami Museum/Barlington Group

Earlier this year the National Trust for Historic Preservation designated Miami’s Little Havana neighborhood a national treasure. Now Little Havana is getting its own museum, on – where else? – Calle Ocho.

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

What are you reading? WLRN wants to know — and we'll share what we, and other people in the South Florida community, are reading every week in this space.

Tell us what you're reading by replying in the comments, or tweet us @WLRN with the hashtag #FridayReads

Arlo Haskell, Key West Literary Seminar executive director

A muggle mystery is afoot in the U.K.

Sometime over a span of a week and a half in mid-April, a burglar (or several) broke into a property in a Birmingham suburb, stealing jewelry and one item that's even more valuable — certainly to Harry Potter fans, at least: an 800-word, handwritten prequel to the series, scrawled on a postcard by J.K. Rowling herself.

Nancy Klingener / WLRN


Rakesh Satyal's new novel checks off a lot of boxes, but its charm lies in the fact that it wears all of it various identities so lightly. This is an immigration story, a coming-out story and something of an old-school feminist story about a timid woman learning to roar.

Growing up, Jill Soloway had a hard time relating to women as they were portrayed on TV. Soloway would watch The Love Boat or Fantasy Island and feel uncomfortable with the version of femininity the shows put forth.

"In fact, all the way up through watching Sex and the City, I would feel incredibly upset by what I thought was an expectation of me," Soloway says. "[It] was, 'You should really love cute shoes,' and, 'Because you're a woman, you're going to go crazy for a particular dress.' "

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