Zika Tests

Mix-Up Leaves Pregnant Woman In Dark About Zika Risk

Jun 21, 2017

Hospital officials in Washington state have apologized after failing for months to inform a pregnant woman she was likely infected with the Zika virus that can cause devastating birth defects.

Florida scientists have developed a new test for Zika that would produce results in less than an hour.

And the test can detect the Zika virus in the blood of humans or mosquitoes.

Carl Juste / Miami Herald

The mayors of Miami-Dade County and Miami Beach on Sunday accused the Florida Department of Health of lying after the state agency said last week that it never told local officials to hide the locations in Miami Beach where mosquitoes carrying the Zika virus were captured.

C.M. GUERRERO / EL NUEVO HERALD

More money is coming to fight Zika.

On Thursday Governor Rick Scott announced that he would allocate $25 million dollars in state funds to help fight the mosquito-borne virus. This is in addition to the $36 million he has already allocated for combating the virus, which can cause severe birth defects.

The governor says the state must focus on finding a vaccine to protect pregnant women and their developing babies. Thus the latest funding from Scott is slated to go toward research into finding a vaccine and a more cost-effective way to test for the disease.

Miami Herald

Recently, Daniel Chang of the Miami Herald published a piece about the Florida Department of Health's underreporting of Zika cases. Shortly after that piece, the DOH sent out a rebuttal (see below). We spoke with Chang about where he got his information and what questions the state has refused to answer.

What is your take on the DOH's rebuttal of your story?

Associated Press

How long does a pregnant woman have to wait to find out if she does or does not have the Zika virus?

 

A town hall in Miami on Thursday night made it clear the Florida Department of Health has been significantly understating the amount of time it takes.


Associated Press

 

The Food and Drug Administration wants all U.S. blood centers to start screening for Zika, a major expansion intended to protect the nation's blood supply from the mosquito-borne virus.

Friday's advisory means all U.S. states and territories will need to begin testing blood donations for Zika. Previously, the FDA had limited the requirement to Puerto Rico and two Florida counties.

Zika Tests And What We Know About Them

Aug 15, 2016
The Times/Richard Pohle

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has approved two types of testing for Zika virus in humans. Generally, the type of test to be used will depend on the "exposure date" or when the patient believes he or she has been exposed to the virus.

The first type of tests are the Reverse-Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction Tests (RT-PCR).