Wynwood

Basel Recap: What You Missed Over The Weekend

Dec 2, 2013
Maria Murriel / WLRN

WLRN-Miami Herald News brings Art Basel to you through our digital coverage -- and our community of listeners.

Art Basel goes beyond the Miami Beach Convention Center. In the next few days, we want to know what you think about the art, people, and events you're seeing throughout South Florida during Basel.   Here are two things we're looking for:

Natalie Edgar

Crowds frequenting Wynwood's eccentric bars and restaurants likely don't think of the old neighborhood's longtime residents, some of whom have had to leave their homes after the area's recent art revival.

But some Wynwood natives have been pushed out. The neighborhood's gentrification is explored in the documentary "Right to Wynwood."

Wynwood Brewing Company Prepares To Open

Nov 21, 2013
Wynwood Brewing Company / Instagram

Just east of the I-95 in Wynwood, on Northwest 24th Street, you'll notice a new, bright-orange mural is in the works. It's not a famed, European street artist's Art Basel-commissioned piece. It's Wynwood Brewing Company's way of welcoming Basel throngs to Miami's first brewery.

Katia Savchuk

For five blocks along Interstate 95 on the western edge of Miami's Wynwood neighborhood, you can buy women's clothing, jewelry and handbags in practically every store.

Not everybody knows about Miami's "Fashion District." But 20 years ago, it existed almost exactly the same as it does today in the mind's eye of Korean entrepreneurs.

Woo Ho Lee walked the block on a recent weekday afternoon, pointing out landmarks and remembering one of his mentors, Mr. Park.

Marva Hinton

Magnolia North is the new name for an area in Opa-locka, which was formerly dubbed The Triangle and known for drugs and crime. Now city leaders hope Magnolia North will be known for galleries and studios and become the next vibrant arts district in South Florida.

Decision Helps Walmart Inch Closer To Miami's Midtown

Aug 14, 2013
Courtesy of City of Miami Planning Department

Miami’s planning director has given Walmart the green light to build a new store in the city's Midtown district. However, Walmart still has more hoops to jump through before it can carve out a place in Midtown.

It’s been a two-year battle for the retailer associated with boxy, suburban stores to win the right to build in the trendy, urban neighborhood.

Walmart can now apply for a building permit since Miami’s Planning Director Francisco Garcia decided the company’s plans meet the local zoning code.

In the annals of pop culture history, the name Linda Lovelace is synonymous with the mainstream notoriety of hardcore porn.

As the 23-year-old star of the infamous 1972 XXX feature Deep Throat, she scandalized America with the first feature-length adult movie.

But Linda Lovelace was just a character for the woman born Linda Susan Boreman — and one she didn't necessarily play willingly.

Gabriella Watts / WLRN

 

Miami Club Rum, located in the heart of Wynwood, was launched in November of 2012.  Owner and operator Matt Malone’s family comes from a long history of rum making: his children are the sixth generation of rum makers in a tradition that dates back to the 1800's. So, after his grandfather-in-law passed away, Malone decided to bring the family tradition from Puerto Rico to Miami. 

Coconut Grove Grapevine

A weekly look at noteworthy South Florida blogs and posts:

Plans For New Coconut Grove Waterfront Are In

Grove Bay Investment Group has submitted a proposal for what may become "The Harbour" in historic Coconut Grove.

The city manager, city commission and Miami voters still have to approve plans for the area, which include a tree park, retail space and a monument or exhibit of South Florida aviation history.

Vividly

Thanks to YouTube, anyone can be a filmmaker. Thanks to Quirky, anyone can be an inventor. And now thanks to Miami natives Sabrina and Silvia Scandar and their soon-to-be-launched website, Vividly, anyone can be a fashion designer.

Photo by Neil de la Flor

The 2013 Miami Performance International Festival obliterates the line between viewers and mid-career and emerging artists from Miami and around the world. In its second year, the festival, curated by Charo Oquet, takes place in Miami’s Design District and the Miami Beach Botanical Garden and runs through the month of June.

Video as an art form has come a long way. Although artists started seriously working with the medium at least a half century ago (some will pinpoint Nam June Paik’s German exhibition in 1963 as its official arrival on the scene), it remained somewhat the stepchild, not getting a lot of respect until the last couple decades. And in Miami, video art – good video art – was late in taking hold with local artists and in shows. That’s changed dramatically in recent years, and yet there have been few outlets dedicated to highlighting the form.

Ruben Ubiera is one busy guy. Ask him what he's up to and prepare to hear an earful. The Broward County resident recently wrapped up the Lexicon show at Young at Art Museum in Davie, where he has also led a workshop for children artists. And his 10-by-4-foot self portrait puppet, representing Ubiera's artistic life, will remain in the museum's permanent collection.

Five Reasons To Hack For Change In Wynwood On Saturday

May 28, 2013

On Saturday and Sunday, The LAB Miami will host the first-annual Hack for Change: Miami as part of the National Day of Civic Hacking. The event endeavors to bring together citizens in the spirit of collaboration to develop new technological solutions for some our country’s oldest problems. Or, as the national website puts it, “to do what is most quintessentially American: roll up our sleeves, get involved, and work together to improve our society.”

Yes, Art Abounds North Of Wynwood

May 13, 2013
Photo courtesy FAT Village Facebook page

Last week's satirical Fort Lauderdale slam by The Onion claimed the city “lacks any kind of cultural depth," something hotly disputed by locals.

So, where are the cultural gems in Broward and Palm Beach counties? Don’t get fooled by the wealth of strip malls, high-rises, and balmy palm tree landscape.

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