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Becoming Citizens In Little Havana

Jun 6, 2014
Creative Commons

You've probably heard of Hispanic Heritage Month, Black History Month, Asian History Month. 

Now we have Immigrant Heritage Month -- which was unveiled Thursday during a naturalization ceremony in one of the country's most famous immigrant enclaves, Miami's Little Havana.

At the event, hosted by Miami Dade College inside Little Havana's Tower Theater, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services formally recognized June as the time to honor immigrants.

No Report Card, No Apartment

Jun 5, 2014
www.beloitwi.gov

Sonoma Bay and Marsh Harbour housing developments are facing a federal lawsuit.

Both of the housing complexes require parents to provide their children’s school records, specifically their report cards.

A fair housing group in Palm Beach County was alerted to this fact after the developments placed an ad on Craigslist.

Vince Larkins, the president and CEO of the Fair Housing Center of the Greater Palm Beaches says it violates the Fair Housing Act.

Andrew Soria / RAW: Miami

  

Cory Hunter slowly drags the tip of a metal rod across a cardboard canvas. Long, branching patterns emerge on the surface as sparks of electricity flare out.

Hunter studied chemical engineering at the University of Florida, but now he's an artist who paints with high-voltage electricity.

The branching patterns that have become a staple of his paintings are something that typically happens in nature -- usually as a result of lightning striking a tree, the air, or another “non-conductor.”

Palm Beach County Prepares For Chikungunya

Jun 4, 2014
http://ollie4bugboard.com/florida-keys-mosquito-control-part2-waterways/

 

Palm Beach County is now joining efforts to fight the mosquito-transmitted virus known as Chikungunya, which so far has infected one person in the county and 10 people total in the state.

The virus is rarely fatal but symptoms can include chronic pain that lasts for years.

“Look at your house, environment, make sure that you don´t have any standing water," says Tim O´Connor, spokesman for the Florida Department of Health in Palm Beach County. "If you do, drain it off as much as possible.”   

A Miami Story: The Litzes Take Miami

Jun 4, 2014

This story, as told by Ronni Litz Julien, is part of an oral history series. 

Sheila Presser (Bronx-born) and Norman Litz (a Philadelphian) both moved to Florida with their families in 1946. 

Sheila graduated from South Broward High School, named “wittiest” in her senior class.  Norman graduated from Miami High School, a left-handed star pitcher on the baseball team; he was also known as “Lefty Litz.”  Upon graduation, the University of Miami offered Norman a baseball scholarship; he pitched for two years as a Miami Hurricane. 

Creative Commons

Drivers for a new ride-sharing service, Lyft, are now facing significant fines and penalties from Miami-Dade County. The service has been around for about two weeks now, but it's operating illegally.

The fines don't seem to be scaring off Uber, the company that faced opposition from county officials last year. Wednesday, Uber plans to launch a service similar to Lyft, UberX, and will offer free rides through June 20. 

Being A Meteorologist Is Harder Than You Think

Jun 2, 2014
Constanza Gallardo

Hurricane season started Sunday. A slow season is expected this year, but meteorologists know their forecasts constantly change.

So, meteorologists in South Florida partnered with the Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science for its annual Feel the Force event, where the community learned about hurricane preparedness.

Thirteen-year-old Lucas Sanchez was a meteorologist for the day with help from local pros from WSVN-TV and WPLG Local 10.

Why Flooding Can't Be Prevented In South Florida

May 30, 2014
the Miami Herald

There's a reason flooding is always a possibility when it storms in South Florida.

"Our flood-control system was built over 60 years ago to handle two million people. We now have almost eight million people," says Gabe Margasak, a public information officer for the South Florida Water Management District.

Because of this, in the past six years the District spent about $270 million in upgrades. 

http://www.themiamibikescene.com

If you're driving through East Little Havana, West Miami, Flagami, West Flagler, West Little Havana, or downtown Miami Friday night, it's critical you take a look at the map below.

Starting at 6:30 p.m., hundreds of cyclists will gather at the Government Center downtown for Critical Mass in Miami, a group bike ride that happens in cities around the world on the final Friday of the month. The ride in Miami starts at 7:15 p.m.

Tomorrow is also Game Six of the NBA playoffs, which means traffic to see the Heat play the Pacers at the AmericanAirlines Arena will be dense.

NOAA Predicts A Near-Normal Hurricane Season

May 29, 2014
Constanza Gallardo

South Florida has started preparing for this year's hurricane season. Local, state and federal officials met this week at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Miami to discuss the latest developments and what this years' storms looks like for the region. 

Researchers at NOAA predict a near-normal to below-normal season this year.

Creative Commons / Flickr user pboyd04

  Fats, oils and grease from your favorite restaurant in Broward County will be converted to produce energy for its waste-water treatment plant in Pompano Beach.

The project, which launched last week, will impact the community both economically and environmentally.   

“We are looking at a savings of $27 million over the 17-year period,” says Broward Mayor Barbara Sharief.

Mayor Sharief says this process will create more than 400 jobs, reduce emissions that pollute the air by 30 percent and energy consumption for the county.  

Did Safety Measures Water Down Urban Beach Week?

May 23, 2014
Emily Michot / Miami Herald

Memorial Day usually means one thing in Miami Beach: Urban Beach Week.

We’ve seen the fuss about Urban Beach Week in the past. We know swarms of people populate Miami Beach clad in the latest fashions and driving the flashiest cars. The mere word “traffic” probably sends a migraine spiraling through your head, as thoughts of closed streets, congested roads and an army of police officers consume your mind.

But there doesn't seem to be as much fuss this year. 

Lisann Ramos

Florida International University hosted a panel discussion between leaders of different faiths Wednesday evening. The theme of this interfaith dialogue was “Love and Compassion is Our True Nature.”

Representatives from six different religions each spoke about compassion and how it relates to their practices.

The panel was put together to celebrate the 40th anniversary of Paramahamsa Hariharananda’s journey to the West. He was born in India, studied all religions and worked and lived in Miami before passing away in 2002.

The lineup for the second annual III Points festival in Wynwood was revealed yesterday morning.

Headlining the event are electronic-music and hip-hop producer Flying Lotus and Lykki Li, who combines hip-hop and folk elements in her music. Hot Natured, a popular EDM group, will make its U.S. debut.

The festival will also include performances from Hercules and Love Affair, Jacques Green, Miami's Jacuzzi Boys and Deaf Poets, among others.

We Want To Know: What Makes You Stay In South Florida?

May 22, 2014
Wilson Sayre

 South Florida is an expensive place. Thirty-eight percent of working households in Miami spend at least half of their income on housing, according to the Miami Herald and the Florida Center for Investigative Reporting. 

Combine that with rising gas prices, congested traffic and lack of job opportunities -- it makes us wonder: What makes you stay in South Florida?

Is it the tropical climate, the beaches, the pastelitos, or something more personal? What do you sacrifice -- financially or otherwise -- by living here?

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