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Philip Bacon, president of the South Florida nonprofit Urban Philanthropies, says this weekend’s hiring fair isn’t just about jobs.

“A job is a vehicle toward a career,” he says.

That’s the philosophy of the Global 1000 hiring event that kicked off on Thursday.

 

Martin Luther King Jr.’s grassroots Poor People’s Campaign ended as soon as it started. But, nearly 50 years later, the coalition is reforming across the nation. A group in Florida has formed its own sect of the campaign, one of 32 states. And on Monday, at a press conference, the group announced its new objectives. 

Updated Jan. 30

The job market is strong right now, with a 4.1 percent unemployment rate, and President Trump knows it.

In his State of the Union address, he said he is "proud" that "African-American unemployment stands at the lowest rate ever recorded. And Hispanic-American unemployment has also reached the lowest levels in history."

Earier this month, he also bragged about the latest jobs report, focusing in on minorities in particular.

courtsey of David Fine/Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta

Raphael Bostic is not a familiar name.

That is unless you work deep inside the financial industry or operate inside academic circles researching the economy. Bostic is the president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta. His territory includes South Florida.

He says he worries a lot about economic mobility. He thinks all business owners should be concerned about paying their employees enough to afford a decent quality of life, and he's comfortable with the Fed's approach to slowly raise interest rates.

Are People Getting Unemployment Help Post-Irma?

Oct 25, 2017

People who need unemployment assistance after Hurricane Irma might not be getting the help that is available to them.

One in eight Americans — 42 million people — still struggles to get enough to eat. And while that number has been going down recently, hunger appears to be getting worse in some economically distressed areas, especially in rural communities.

Food banks that serve these areas are also feeling the squeeze, as surplus food supplies dwindle but the lines of people seeking help remain long.

Florida experienced a big upswing in January employment after a sluggish December. 

Unemployment dropped by 0.3 percentage points, to 4.6 percent, last month — the lowest rate since 2007 — according to the monthly jobs report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The Labor Department's May jobs report, released Friday, was surprisingly bad.

Economists scrambled to explain why they hadn't seen a hiring dropoff coming. Most had predicted about 160,000 new jobs for May, but in fact, only 38,000 materialized. That was the smallest increase since September, 2010.

Florida's unemployment rate continues to drop slightly.

The August unemployment rate was 5.3 percent, compared to 5.5 percent in July. The state added 19,600 jobs last month, according to figures released Friday by the Department of Economic Opportunity.

The jobless rate remains higher than the national rate of 5.1 percent with approximately 507,000 unemployed Floridians.

Gov. Rick Scott made the announcement at the headquarters of a Boca Raton electronic security company. He's made job creation the main focus during his time in office.

Florida's Jobless Rate Down To 5.5 Percent

Jul 17, 2015
piotr mamnaimie / flickr via https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Florida's unemployment rate continues to follow the national trend, dipping as the summer began.

The Sunshine State's jobless mark for June stood at 5.5 percent, below the 5.7 percent rate that was recorded in May, the state Department of Economic Opportunity announced Friday. The rate had hovered around 5.7 percent since the end of 2014.

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

Creative Commons via Flickr user veggiefrog / http://bit.ly/XP2kMT

 

South Florida saw no major changes in the latest unemployment numbers. But the best news this month goes to the construction industry, which had the largest increase in job numbers. Over 43,000 construction jobs were added over the past year -- more than any other state in the country.

Ken Simonson, chief economist for the Associated General Contractors of America, says some of the increase has to do with a backlog of construction jobs that were stalled during the 2008 recession.

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

Creative Commons / Flickr user 401(K) 2013

Felons, high-school dropouts and the poor might get a helping hand when looking for a job in Broward County.

The County Commission is considering an ordinance that would require contractors to try and give half of those new contract-related jobs to hard-to-hire people.

"Try" is the operative word.

The ordinance would not require contractors to actually hire these people. They just have to make a good faith effort to find someone who falls into the hard-to-hire category. 

 

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