transportation

CRRC


Miami Herald file photo

Mayor Carlos Gimenez last year was a big supporter of the Miami-Dade County SMART Plan to build trains along six high-traffic travel corridors. But the mayor recently changed his position.

Emily Michot / Miami Herald

What's the smartest way for Miami-Dade to address its excruciating traffic problems?

 

Not the trains in the $3.3-billion SMART (Strategic Miami Area Rapid Transit) Plan the county rolled out just last year, according to Mayor Carlos Gimenez.

Emily Michot / MIAMI HERALD FILE PHOTO 2016

Miami-Dade can’t afford to build more rail lines and should invest millions in transit dollars creating modernized express bus systems running north and south, Mayor Carlos Gimenez said Monday.

 

“I look at this as part of my job: Be realistic, bring us down to earth,” Gimenez told members of a county transportation board. “I know there’s going to be push back. I know there’s going to be a lot of people who have different ideas about what we should do. But we’ve been looking at this for some time. And these numbers are real.”

Flickr

Uber for kids?

 

It could be a thing in Miami soon, with the debut of a ride-sharing service that's a new spin on the after-school carpool.

 

 

Emilly Michot / Miami Herald

A day after concerns about westward growth sunk a request to extend the 836 expressway into Kendall, Miami-Dade’s mayor stepped in to try to revive the proposal with county commissioners.

Mayor Carlos Gimenez called for the commission to reconsider Tuesday’s 3-2 committee vote against the proposed extension. The plan would take the busy expressway past the county’s Urban Development Boundary, which divides intense development from land with growth restrictions designed to protect the Everglades.

C.M. Guerrero / El Nuevo Herald

A controversial proposal to extend State Road 836 -- aka the Dolphin Expressway -- is making its way to Miami-Dade County commissioners. The extension would be a 15-mile north-south highway to and from the Kendall area; it would give commuters another highway option west of Florida’s Turnpike. Critics say the extension would bring development farther west and closer to the Everglades.

Charles Trainor Jr. / Miami Herald Staff

The last hand-collected toll at Card Sound Bridge will be taken July 31.

The toll gate at the Miami-Dade-Monroe  County line was one of the last human-staffed tolls in South Florida. For decades, the toll has been $1 for most vehicles, with an extra 50 cents for each additional axle.

Construction on the new automated toll system will start Aug. 1. That will include a Sunpass electronic tolling system. While it's under construction, no tolls will be collected. It's scheduled for completion in February of next year, according to a press release from Monroe County.

Walter Michot / Miami Herald

Miami-Dade County leaders eager to dive in on a long-term, multi-project transit plan are divided over how to pick which project to fund first.

Florida Department of Transportation

It's intended to connect the MacArthur Causeway with I-95 and the Dolphin Expressway, but a project to improve I-395 has divided Miami-Dade leaders and the Florida Department of Transportation. And with FDOT's selection of a project contractor on Friday, local leaders say the state transportation agency has work to do to bridge an ideological gap.

AdamFirst via Wikimedia Commons

A controversial proposal to extend State Road 836 — aka the Dolphin Expressway — has been delayed on its route to the Miami-Dade County Commission.

The county’s Government Operations Committee, which consists of five county commissioners,  announced Tuesday it's deferring until next month a vote on the plan that would extend the western end of 836 south by about 15 miles into Kendall. The plan aims to give commuters another highway option west of Florida’s Turnpike. But critics say the expansion would encourage more development in agricultural areas and the Everglades.

Kara Starzyk

Monday is the 25th anniversary of Fort Lauderdale’s Sun Trolley system, and the celebration promises to be a multi-sensory experience.

The eye-catching red-and-yellow trolleys run on eight routes through Fort Lauderdale, taking riders to the beach, shopping and work. By the end of the month, they'll have a new app and website to make seeing routes and tracking transit easier.

Matias Ocner

 


Miami-Dade County is rolling out new technology to improve transit.

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