suicide

There's a perception that children don't kill themselves, but that's just not true. A new report shows that, for the first time, suicide rates for U.S. middle school students have surpassed the rate of death by car crashes.

The suicide rate among youngsters ages 10 to 14 has been steadily rising, and doubled in the U.S. from 2007 to 2014, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2014, 425 young people 10 to 14 years of age died by suicide.

Bullying and cyberbullying are major risk factors for teen suicide. And both the bullies and their victims are at risk.

That's according to a report from the American Academy of Pediatrics that urges pediatricians and family doctors to routinely screen teenagers for suicide risks.

Health News Florida

Keeping guns away from those with serious mental illness could help reduce gun suicides.

  

That’s according to a new study out this week in the Health Affairs journal that looked at more than 81,000 adults in Florida with serious mental illness. Researchers got data on residents in Tampa and Miami with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression who received care in a publicly-funded health care setting; that data was married with court records and health records.

  Florida's rural counties are seeing suicide rates for youth almost double that of the state's large cities. And experts say isolation, poverty, access to firearms and a lack of mental health resources are to blame.

American Foundation For Suicide Prevention / Instagram

  The Florida Keys has a national reputation for being laid back and carefree — margaritaville.

But Monroe County, which encompasses the island chain, has the state's highest suicide rate.

Creative Commons of Charles Bell's Anatomy of the Brain, c. 1802 / Flickr user Shaheen Lakhan

08/05/14 - Tuesday’s Topical Currents delves into a mother’s heart-wrenching story of her daughter’s suicide…her unimaginable and all-consuming grief, her guilt, and her struggle to find peace. Joan E.

http://www.drdphillips.com/

02/11/14 - Tuesday's Topical Currents begins with Dr. Deborah Phillips . . . her latest book is HOW TO FALL OUT OF LOVE.  She says our culture is geared to fall in love . . . but little advice is given to how to point the way out.  It can lead to depression . . . even suicide.