Spanish

Language
6:04 pm
Wed September 24, 2014

More English, More Money? Maybe Not In Miami

A new report says workers with poor English skills may be dragging down the economy.
Credit freedigitalphotos.net

The list of things that threaten the U. S. economy is long, indeed. But here's one item that might not have occurred to you.

Speaking bad English.

As the Brookings Institution scopes it out in a report released Wednesday, immigrants seeking work in the U. S. often have to settle for jobs beneath their qualifications just because their English is not up to snuff.

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Media
11:39 am
Thu August 29, 2013

Univision's New Cable Channel Fusion Opens HQ In Doral

Doral Mayor Luigi Boria (left) Florida Gov. Rick Scott (middle) and Univision President Cesar Conde (right) take their positions at the ribbon cutting of Fusion, the new ABC/Univision joint venture on August 26.
Credit Patrick Farrell / MIAMI HERALD

Univision dominates Spanish-language broadcasting, more than doubling the audience of its largest rival, Telemundo. But starting this fall, Univision will tackle an audience that has always been foreign to the Doral-based network: people who watch television in English.

With ABC as a partner, Univision is betting big on carving out a niche in English-language television with Fusion, a cable network billed as targeting young Hispanics.

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Miami Accents
7:00 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Miami Accents: Why Locals Embrace That Heavy "L" Or Not

Cedric Dumornay is a Miami-based actor who's been learning to speak without his accent over the past two years. After he won a monologue competition, a Los Angeles producer suggested he take accent reduction classes.
Credit Isabel Echarte

Michelle Antelo was born and raised in Miami but has never lived anywhere else. After learning Spanish at home from her Cuban parents, she always thought her English, which she learned at school, was up to American standards.

But, as many Miamians have learned, her way of speaking stuck out around people from places other than Miami. When Antelo was a cheerleader in high school, her Broward County teammates told her she sounded different.

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Miami Accents
10:21 am
Mon August 26, 2013

Miami Accents: How 'Miamah' Turned Into A Different Sort Of Twang

Nicolas Espinosa, 23, came to Miami with his mother, Maria Jose Pautaso, when he was 10. We tested out his Miami twang in an interview.
Credit Nicolas Espinosa

You might’ve heard it when you're out on the town, at Publix, or at that cafe down the street. Or, you might hear it when you open your own mouth.

RELATED: Miami Accents: Why Locals Embrace That Heavy "L" Or Not

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Language
1:18 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

How I Learned To Swear In Cuban

Guillermo Álvarez Guedes, the Cuban comic who made a common Cuban expletive his trademark, died last week in Miami at age 86.
Gaston De Cardenas/El Nuevo Herald MCT via Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 11:38 am

Editor's note: Fair warning — this essay is, in part, about Spanish profanities, and it includes several.

The man who taught me to swear in Cuban died last week.

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Diversity
7:51 am
Wed July 24, 2013

More Latinos Read All About It In English

Customers browse for English-language magazines and newspapers at a New York newsstand.
Mark Lennihan AP

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 11:33 pm

A growing share of Latinos in the U.S. are getting their news in English.

New survey results released Tuesday by the Pew Hispanic Center show that 82 percent of Latino adults, up from 78 percent in 2006, use some form of English-language news media.

At the same time, fewer Latino adults — now at 68 percent, down from 78 percent in 2006 — are consuming news from Spanish-language TV, print, radio and online outlets.

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Television
8:03 am
Tue July 23, 2013

In The Summer, Univision Is Numero Uno

Pitbull and Jennifer Lopez recently performed on Univision's Premios Juventud.
Rodrigo Varela Univision

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 9:32 am

For three consecutive weeks this summer, Spanish-language TV network Univision won the prime-time ratings among young adult viewers. The network is bragging about its prime-time ratings domination with full-page ads in the LA Times, New York Times and Wall Street Journal. Its English-language video exclaims: "For the first time ever, Univision is now the number one network in any language."

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Labor
2:59 pm
Thu July 18, 2013

How To Better Protect Farmworkers From Pesticides: Spanish

Farmworkers harvest and package cantaloupes near Firebaugh, Calif.
Gosia Wozniacka AP

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 1:02 pm

Advocates for farmworkers, especially those who grow America's leafy greens and fresh vegetables, are pushing the government to do more to protect those workers from exposure to pesticides.

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Business
7:00 am
Fri May 24, 2013

Why Miami Is Now A Hub For Latino TV

Hosts Jorge Ramos (left) and Maria Elena Salinas (center) sit with President Obama at the University of Miami September 20, 2012 in Coral Gables.
Credit Carolyn Kaster

If you had to guess where most of the TV programming for Latinos is being produced these days, where would you guess? L.A., New York, Texas? How about Miami? A recent deal has solidified Miami as a major television hub.

Ana Sagastegui was born in Peru. She has worked in the Miami TV industry for 20 years. Sagastegui remembers how different Miami was then. Just a few broadcast studios but plenty of open space.

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Gateway Miami
10:32 am
Tue April 30, 2013

Stadium Issues Dog Brazil Ahead Of 2014 World Cup

The renovated Maracana stadium hosts a game by the teams "Friends of Bebeto" and "Friends of Ronaldo" during the stadium's inauguration in Rio de Janeiro on Saturday.
Silvia Izquierdo AP

Originally published on Tue April 30, 2013 11:19 am

Soccer isn't just a sport in Brazil, it's a religion, and the main temple is the Maracana in Rio de Janeiro.

The venue is not only the biggest stadium in Brazil but the biggest in South America. Over the weekend, the newly renovated complex reopened to great fanfare, with stirring musical numbers, a light show and dignitaries including Brazil's president.

The headlines in the local media, however, focused not on the fanfare but on the many problems, from flooding in the VIP area to malfunctioning seats and turnstiles. The stadium was also four months late reopening.

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