Spanish

Creative Commons via Flickr / Boston Public Library (https://flic.kr/p/dm191d)

Today on the Florida Roundup, we're talking special session, soccer and Spanish.

SPECIAL SESSION

At 1 p.m. Monday afternoon gavels will fall in the Florida House and Senate, calling to order a special session of the state Legislature. Lawmakers have only one piece of business to take care of: pass a budget before July 1 or risk a state government shutdown.

freedigitalphotos.net

The list of things that threaten the U. S. economy is long, indeed. But here's one item that might not have occurred to you.

Speaking bad English.

As the Brookings Institution scopes it out in a report released Wednesday, immigrants seeking work in the U. S. often have to settle for jobs beneath their qualifications just because their English is not up to snuff.

Patrick Farrell / MIAMI HERALD

Univision dominates Spanish-language broadcasting, more than doubling the audience of its largest rival, Telemundo. But starting this fall, Univision will tackle an audience that has always been foreign to the Doral-based network: people who watch television in English.

With ABC as a partner, Univision is betting big on carving out a niche in English-language television with Fusion, a cable network billed as targeting young Hispanics.

Miami Accents: Why Locals Embrace That Heavy "L" Or Not

Aug 27, 2013
Isabel Echarte

Michelle Antelo was born and raised in Miami but has never lived anywhere else. After learning Spanish at home from her Cuban parents, she always thought her English, which she learned at school, was up to American standards.

But, as many Miamians have learned, her way of speaking stuck out around people from places other than Miami. When Antelo was a cheerleader in high school, her Broward County teammates told her she sounded different.

Nicolas Espinosa

You might’ve heard it when you're out on the town, at Publix, or at that cafe down the street. Or, you might hear it when you open your own mouth.

RELATED: Miami Accents: Why Locals Embrace That Heavy "L" Or Not

Editor's note: Fair warning — this essay is, in part, about Spanish profanities, and it includes several.

The man who taught me to swear in Cuban died last week.

A growing share of Latinos in the U.S. are getting their news in English.

New survey results released Tuesday by the Pew Hispanic Center show that 82 percent of Latino adults, up from 78 percent in 2006, use some form of English-language news media.

At the same time, fewer Latino adults — now at 68 percent, down from 78 percent in 2006 — are consuming news from Spanish-language TV, print, radio and online outlets.

For three consecutive weeks this summer, Spanish-language TV network Univision won the prime-time ratings among young adult viewers. The network is bragging about its prime-time ratings domination with full-page ads in the LA Times, New York Times and Wall Street Journal. Its English-language video exclaims: "For the first time ever, Univision is now the number one network in any language."

Advocates for farmworkers, especially those who grow America's leafy greens and fresh vegetables, are pushing the government to do more to protect those workers from exposure to pesticides.

Why Miami Is Now A Hub For Latino TV

May 24, 2013
Carolyn Kaster

If you had to guess where most of the TV programming for Latinos is being produced these days, where would you guess? L.A., New York, Texas? How about Miami? A recent deal has solidified Miami as a major television hub.

Ana Sagastegui was born in Peru. She has worked in the Miami TV industry for 20 years. Sagastegui remembers how different Miami was then. Just a few broadcast studios but plenty of open space.

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