social media

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Presidential elections have always sparked conversation around the dinner table and at news stands. Then, with the growth of media, that conversation spread to every screen and speaker imaginable.

Now, the platform for political talk is social media. And it could very well be changing the structure of the campaign as we know it.

On Feb. 9, 26-year-old Carolina Herlle shared this video on her Facebook page:

Teen Suspected Of Using Nude Photos To Extort Sex

Mar 11, 2016
Emily Poisel / Creative Commons

A Homestead teen was arrested Wednesday on suspicion of using nude photographs to extort sex from two younger high school classmates. It’s the latest  in a growing trend of  sexting-related cases seen at schools around the country.

The alleged incidents at Homestead Senior High School followed a familiar script: A boy using the telephone-messaging app KIK contacted girls demanding nude photos and threatening revenge if they refused.

Adam Fagen/flickr

While students are out of school for the holiday break, Florida’s attorney general is waging a Twitter campaign to keep kids safe in cyberspace. The campaign urges parents to get a good look into their children’s electronic devices.

Kids have more time to spend online when school is out. Attorney General Pam Bondi says predators know this and are looking for potential victims. She says predators use online games with message boards and Internet chat rooms to pose as teenagers and ask for face-to-face meetings. 

When posts like these flood your news feeds, you know it's peak season for the king of fruit. 

Mangos ripen during South Florida summers. And because they tend to grow right in people’s backyards, it’s become a tradition to share them with friends, family and co-workers.

Scroll below for some mango shots from across South Florida, and share your mango photos with us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

John O'Connor / StateImpact Florida

Ashley Jean is graduating from Miami’s iPrep Academy this week. And then she’s planning to travel the world.

Jean will start a global studies program through Long Island University that will eventually take her to places like Costa Rica, Australia, Bali and Spain.

That’s a lot of plane tickets.

“I don’t want money to be a reason why I can’t change my life,” Jean says, “so I have to work hard to do what I can to get this program.”

Kenny Malone / WLRN

In the middle of the night, Brenda Shapiro woke up and thought: “LibbyLicious.” The prefect name for a small baking business built from a mandelbread recipe handed down by her husband’s grandmother, Grandma Libby.

Unfortunately, the South Florida baker did not wake up with a social media strategy.

“This is why I have my daughter-in-law do this for me,” Shapiro says. “I’m busy baking, delivering, packaging, going out and selling my cookies myself. I’m a one-person show.”

Jason Howie / Flickr Creative Commons (CC By 2.0)

The social media app Instagram claims 300 million users document their lives through uploaded daily worldwide. But not all of them use the app wisely, as some Miami Instagrammers have had their posts used against them as evidence in criminal cases.

One Miamian unknowingly published an act of voyeurism while another used the app to aid his criminal activity by uploading pictures of stolen goods for sale. 

But why do people turn to social media with incriminating content?

davidpogue.com

01/20/15 - Most aging boomers are baffled by ever-changing personal technology:  what percentage of, say, smart phone functions do you understand?  The average is but six percent.   Tuesday’s Topical Currents features former New York Times tech columnist David Pogue.   He has answers in POGUE’S BASICS:  Essential Tips

www.endofabsence.com

08/11/14 - Monday’s Topical Currents considers how our constant connectivity is engulfing our world.  What have we lost to the long hours we spend in digital space?  Award-winning writer Michael Harris has authored, The End of Absence: Reclaiming What We’ve Lost in a World of Constant Connectivity

Tinou Bao / Creative Commons//Flickr

Degrading Facebook comments about Palestinians caused two assistant Broward County public defenders to be fired on Tuesday.

The Facebook comments were published in a story by the Sun Sentinel, which discussed the recent kidnapping and murder of three Israeli boys by Islamic militant group Hamas. The remarks from assistant public defenders Gary Sheres and Bruce Raticoff referred to Palestinians as "filthy swine," "cockroaches," and even suggested they be "burn[ed] to the ground."

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