Sea-Level Rise

US Geological Survey

A study finds that South Florida maybe can’t blame the rest of the world for saltwater seeping into the groundwater, also called saltwater intrusion. 

The White House is painting a dire picture for every region in the nation, especially South Florida, if action isn't taken to combat climate change. Some states' Republican lawmakers still are not buying it.

Things won't be pretty in South Florida if the latest White House climate assessment is right. You can expect intensified storms and a sea that will keep steadily encroaching on your way of life slowly nipping away at that shore your toes used to trust.

Florida House of Representatives

State Senate President Don Gaetz likes to introduce House Speaker Will Weatherford as the “taller, smarter, better-looking version of the Weatherford-Gaetz” duo. Their alliance has led to the quick passage of legislation like last year's ethics reform package and this year's sex offender bills. But on several education bills, the two diverge.

Creative Commons / Flickr user baldeaglebluff

Rhode Island Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse will finish his tour of four southern coastal states with a final stop in South Florida Friday.

He has been talking with scientists, residents and business owners during his week-long trip to discuss rising seas. It’s part of an effort to get congress more engaged with the issue by relaying stories from the people and towns dealing with the issue.

The senator will be in South Florida Friday and will moderate the South Florida Climate Action rally in Pinecrest.

Hear the full story below:

Do You Know Where Your Water Comes From?

Apr 23, 2014
Elaine Chen

This story originally ran on March 13, 2014.


If you mention “desalination,” most people probably think you mean taking salt out of seawater, and they probably think you’re talking about what happens in desert nations in the Middle East.

Lisann Ramos

Miami Beach City Hall was at capacity this Earth Day when Sen. Bill Nelson held a field hearing on sea-level rise. 

The hearing attracted environmentalists from across South Florida and the country. 

The witnesses who spoke on account of sea-level rise included government officials Miami Beach Mayor Philip Levine and Broward County Commissioner Kristin Jacobs.

The other witnesses were scientists Piers Sellers and Fred Bloetscher, CEO of the Greater Miami Convention & Visitors Bureau William Talbert, and Dr. Megan Linkin from the Swiss Re reinsurance company. 

Lisann Ramos

In light of a field hearing organized by Sen. Bill Nelson about climate change and sea-level rise, South Florida environmentalists put on a tour of affected sites in the area.

Several environmental toured sites including Little Havana, which feels the impacts of over-flooding, and a canal flood-control structure that can't keep up with the saltwater levels.

The tour also visited a Sunny Isles Beach condo tower and a Virginia Key sewage plant.


Hurricane season is a few months away, and that may be what was on the mind of legislators this session.

The Legislature is likely to pass a bill allowing people who do not (and maybe even could not) get a concealed-weapons permit to carry a gun if there is a state-declared emergency.

The Miami Herald’s Fred Grimm called it the "Zombie Apocalypse bill."

This week on the Florida Roundup, we'll discuss what the bill is all about, who's pushing for it, and why she Sheriff's Association is a bit concerned about it.

FIU Professors Win Grant For Sea-Level Rise Project

Apr 15, 2014
Jessica Meszaros / WLRN

Florida International University is one of twelve colleges in the country to win a grant from the Challenge Fund for Innovation in Journalism Education this year. Four FIU journalism professors proposed a project on sea-level rise in South Florida. 

Rick Stone

There was an odd moment at the Solar Uprising rally at the state capitol on Thursday, which Charlie Crist attended to be seen championing solar energy for our state.

It was provided by a woman named Debbie Dooley, who addressed the crowd a few minutes before Crist took the stage. What she said was this: "I know I'm unique in this crowd because I like Gov. Scott. But he's wrong on the issue of solar."