Sea-Level Rise

The Florida Roundup
12:10 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Should People Without Permits Be Able To Carry Guns During A Hurricane?

Credit freedigitalphotos.net

    

Hurricane season is a few months away, and that may be what was on the mind of legislators this session.

The Legislature is likely to pass a bill allowing people who do not (and maybe even could not) get a concealed-weapons permit to carry a gun if there is a state-declared emergency.

The Miami Herald’s Fred Grimm called it the "Zombie Apocalypse bill."

This week on the Florida Roundup, we'll discuss what the bill is all about, who's pushing for it, and why she Sheriff's Association is a bit concerned about it.

Read more
Crowd Hydrology
8:18 am
Tue April 15, 2014

FIU Professors Win Grant For Sea-Level Rise Project

Abel Fernandez, broadcast media junior, using FIU's new Media Innovation Incubator Lab at the north campus. Most of the sea-level rise project meetings will take place here. Students have swiveling desks and chairs, 20 laptops, 20 tablets, a smart TV and a view of the campus.
Credit Jessica Meszaros / WLRN

Florida International University is one of twelve colleges in the country to win a grant from the Challenge Fund for Innovation in Journalism Education this year. Four FIU journalism professors proposed a project on sea-level rise in South Florida. 

Read more
Renewable Energy
6:37 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Who Was That Tea Party Lady At The Solar Energy Rally With Charlie Crist?

RALLY IN (AND FOR) THE SUN: Hundreds of students, activists and solar energy entrepreneurs crowded the capitol grounds for Solar Uprising.
Credit Rick Stone

There was an odd moment at the Solar Uprising rally at the state capitol on Thursday, which Charlie Crist attended to be seen championing solar energy for our state.

It was provided by a woman named Debbie Dooley, who addressed the crowd a few minutes before Crist took the stage. What she said was this: "I know I'm unique in this crowd because I like Gov. Scott. But he's wrong on the issue of solar." 

Read more
National Water Dance Project
5:27 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

Miami-Based Dance Project Aims To Raise Sea-Level Rise Awareness Nationally

Student dancers rehearse the Water Project Dance at the Deering Estate on Tuesday, April 7, 2014.
Credit Charles Trainor Jr. / Miami Herald

The broad lawn at the Deering Estate at Cutler runs gently downhill to meet Biscayne Bay, washing up between two massive, palm lined jetties to be greeted, on this bright afternoon, by a mass of young people. They flood across the grass, arms and bodies rippling as they surge into lines and circles and lifts in a dance that looks like both prayer and invocation.

“Keep it alive!” exhorts their director, the Miami choreographer Dale Andree, striding the grass in baseball cap and jeans. “You care about it! This is important!”

Read more
Sea-Level Rise
10:40 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Why Sea-Level Rise Might Hurt Poor Neighborhoods More Than Coastal Areas

Some lower-income neighborhoods may be more vulnerable to the impacts of rising seas than coastal areas.
Credit Keren Bolter

Keren Bolter is a doctoral student of geosciences at Florida Atlantic University researching what areas in South Florida are particularly threatened by rising seas. She says all methods of analysis for the risks of sea-level rise only focus on financial vulnerability -- ranking Fort Lauderdale Beach and Miami Beach as high-risk -- but to her, that's not the whole story.

Read more
Desalination
7:40 am
Thu March 13, 2014

Do You Know Where Your Water Comes From?

Florida desalinates the most water in the United States. Above is the water treatment plant in North Miami Beach, the first city in Miami-Dade to process salty water from the Floridan Aquifer.
Credit Elaine Chen

 

If you mention “desalination,” most people probably think you mean taking salt out of seawater, and they probably think you’re talking about what happens in desert nations in the Middle East.

Read more
Politics
5:47 pm
Tue January 7, 2014

Caribbean Crusader: St. Vincent PM Gonsalves On Development And Disaster

St. Vincent and the Grenadines Prime Minister Ralph Gonsalves assumed the Caricom chairmanship this month.
Credit secretariat.thecommonwealth.org

Christmas 2013 was the best and worst of times for Ralph Gonsalves.

Gonsalves, Prime Minister of the Caribbean island nation of St. Vincent and the Grenadines, met with Pope Francis at the Vatican on Dec. 19. For Gonsalves, an outspoken populist who was about to take over as chairman of the Caribbean Community, or Caricom, it was a moment of valuable political cachet: Francis has proven a champion of poor global underdogs like the small republics of the Caribbean.

Read more
Environment
6:45 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

Coping With Climate Change In Greenland

Credit Joe Raedle / Getty Images

Contribution from the Miami Herald

On an inlet nestled between soaring cliffs, huge chunks of ice shimmer from a distance like precious stones on a cocktail ring.

Read more
Sea-level Rise
6:38 pm
Fri December 13, 2013

Guess What? Seas Are Still Rising

Reporter Wilson Sayre with DNA host Derrick Ashong.
Credit Wilson Sayre

WLRN-Miami Herald News reporter Wilson Sayre spoke on Fusion network's news program DNA with Derrick Ashong to talk about the range of local responses to sea-level rise. She was joined by Andrea Bernstein of WNYC's Transportation Nation.

Read more
Friday Business Report
8:08 am
Tue November 19, 2013

What If South Beach Becomes The Next Venice?

Credit Kenny Malone / WLRN

Structural engineers don't necessarily view rising sea levels as certain disaster. By definition, it's the job of the engineer to solve design and construction problems caused by environmental changes.

Business journalist Karen Rundlet examines some proposed solutions for sea-level rise. She interviews the University of Miami's Dr. Antonio Nanni about embracing some unusual possibilities. Click play to hear the interview.

Read more
Elevation Zero
8:05 am
Mon November 18, 2013

For A Future Glimpse Of Sea-Level Rise, Check Out The King Tide

The Ghost of Sea-Level Rise Future? Last month's King Tide had pedestrians wading through knee-deep water in Miami Beach.
Credit Arianna Prothero

Want to see the effects of sea-level rise?  Don’t want to wait 50 years?  Just walk to virtually any coastal area during the natural phenomenon called “King Tide.”

There are plenty of charts, graphs and artist renderings hinting at what South Florida will look like once sea-level rise gets a foothold.  But experts say it’s probably Mother Nature who offers the most vivid preview of things to come.

Read more
Elevation Zero
8:48 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

LISTEN: Sea-Level Rise In South Florida Town Hall

WLRN-Miami Herald News hosted a coastal-communities town hall on Nov. 7 as part of our more-than-weeklong multimedia series on the effects of sea-level rise, called Elevation Zero: Rising Seas in South Florida.

WLRN anchor Tom Hudson moderated the event, which included a panel of U.S. elected officials from East Coast districts gathered to discuss a response to the threat of rising seas. For more details on the premise, click here.

Read more
Elevation Zero
4:00 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Sea-Level Rise Taking The Pines Out Of Big Pine Key

Credit Nancy Klingener / WLRN

Big Pine Key takes its name from the pine forests that cover the island, about 30 miles from Key West. Rare plants and endangered animals — such as the Key deer — live in those forests.

But now the forests and hammocks are threatened by the rising seas around and beneath them.

Robert Ehrig points to a piece of land that was hardwood hammock when he came to live here 35 years ago.

Read more
The Florida Roundup
3:44 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Sea-Level Rise Will Flood South Florida. Now What?

 

On The Florida Roundup, we continue our special coverage, Elevation Zero - Rising Seas in South Florida by looking at the predictions, the policies and the problems.

Host Tom Hudson will be joined by Curtis Morgan of the Miami Herald, Craig Pittman of the Tampa Bay Times, and Alex Chadwick, formerly of NPR and now producer/reporter of BURN: An Energy Journal.

Read more
Elevation Zero
12:57 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Building For Sea-Level Rise -- Without Rules

The Miami-Dade Wastewater Treatment Plant on Virginia Key.
Credit Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department

  Miami-Dade County has recently worked out a $1.5 billion plan with the Environmental Protection Agency to fix its aging sewer system — an over-burdened network of pipes, pumps and plants that’s leaked a lot of sewage in the past years.

But a local environmental group says there’s a major piece missing from that agreement: climate-change planning in a consent decree.

Read more

Pages