Sea-Level Rise

Florida International University

Floridians have been finding ways to get above high water for thousands of years, going back to the “tree islands” that helped Seminole and Calusa tribes stay dry in the Everglades. But rising seas could soon force wholesale changes in the way our cities and towns operate. At Florida International University, this reality has prompted an inter-disciplinary architecture studio where students are experimenting with designs for climate change.

 

President Obama is telling global leaders that the U.S. is taking the lead on combating climate change. But Congress would have to approve any money for the effort and Republicans are dead set against it. South Florida Congressman Mario Diaz-Balart says the president knows he's deceiving world leaders.

“This is a president who seems to be, every day, more and more out of touch with the reality of the world. And so, you know, would it surprise me if the president went and promised things he couldn’t deliver? It wouldn’t surprise me,” Diaz-Balart says.

Jose Iglesias / Miami Herald

A woman in a beautiful red sari sits on a small stool; She holds a basket full of bright orange persimmons and tries to sell her wares. In a matter of seconds, though, water has risen to her calves, then her hips and then above her head.

Her clothes swirl around her as she tries to grab the floating fruit.

All of this happens in an elevator-sized tank for a performance art piece called Holoscenes  at the Wolfson Campus of Miami Dade College.

A new study released on Wednesday says the Sunshine state needs to do its homework to prepare for weather threats linked to climate change.

It gave Florida an overall C- grade in climate change preparedness.

The study by ICF International and Climate Central is the first assessment of its kind that evaluates how local governments in the U.S. face their climate change threats.

Many people like to visit the coast to enjoy long walks on the beach. But when the sand on the beach threatens to overrun your house and your driveway, it might not seem quite so idyllic anymore.

Some Oregon coastal communities want to form a new type of governmental agency just to deal with the problem of too much sand. Chris Lehman from Here & Now contributor Northwest News Network in Oregon has the story.

FL Center for Environmental Studies

Miami-Dade Clerk of Courts Harvey Ruvin sent a letter last week to South Florida members of Congress urging for the creation of a Federal Resiliency Superfund.

This is another instance of South Florida’s local governments seeking to plan ahead for the effects of sea-level rise.

Ruvin says: “The proposal basically calls upon the federal government to play a part in what has to be an intergovernmental partnership to attack issues from climate change impact such as sea level rise."

Climate Central

A new interactive map shows coastal cities like Miami could potentially be submerged within this century if carbon emissions worldwide continue “business as usual,” says Ben Strauss.

Strauss is vice president of sea level and climate impact at the research nonprofit Climate Central, which published the map.

It illustrates the effect of carbon emissions on sea-level rise through the year 2100.

In South Florida’s case, “the projections are difficult and unfortunate,” says Strauss.

Where Presidential Candidates Stand On Climate Change

Aug 11, 2015

Last week, President Obama released a plan to cut carbon emissions from power plants. Climate change has also been cropping up on the presidential campaign trail — both Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders have released their own proposals.

Kenny Malone

One way Miami Beach might prepare for the threat of rising sea levels is to elevate the whole city.

“The only tried and true solution to combating rising sea levels is to raise with it,” says Eric Carpenter, public works director for the City of Miami Beach.

As the city celebrates its centennial, the top-level engineer and Miami Beach resident spoke with WLRN about how sea-level rise will affect the city’s next 100 years.

Miami's Coast Is Getting A Natural Face-Lift

Mar 18, 2015
Lisann Ramos

Several South Florida municipalities have been making efforts in coastal restoration.

The city of Miami approved major projects on that front in 2010. It did so in an attempt to implement natural solutions to sea-level rise. 

Conservationists are in the process of removing invasive plant species in beach dunes that cause coastline erosion. They are also installing plants that allow dunes to grow and better absorb water.

whitehouse.gov

A South Florida sea-level rise researcher will have one of the best seats in the house for the President’s State of the Union address Tuesday night.

Nicole Hernandez Hammer of Boca Raton will be one of First Lady Michelle Obama’s invited guests.

Hernandez Hammer says her research shows that cities and regions most vulnerable to the effects of climate change and sea-level rise also have large Hispanic populations.

“Most people don’t know about our vulnerability. That was really eye-opening and encouraged me to go into advocacy,” she says.

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

A wave of high tides is expected to hit much of the East Coast this week. These special tides — king tides — occur a few times a year when the moon's orbit brings it close to the Earth.

But scientists say that lately, even normal tides throughout the year are pushing water higher up onto land. And that's causing headaches for people who live along coastlines.

As Bob Dylan might have put it, the tides, they are a changin'.

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