racism

WLRN

Author Ta Nehisi Coates didn't hold back on his stinging criticisms of President Donald Trump during a recent visit to Miami. Coates, a writer for the Atlantic, has written extensively on race in America. The event was put on by Miami's Book Fair and Books & Books. It was held at the Miami Dade College Wolfson Campus on Thursday, Jan. 11. 

We'll go back to that event and listen to a large portion of the conversation between Coates and WLRN's Nadege Green, who was the moderator of the event.

Odalis Garcia / WLRN

This is not the first time that sculptor and University of Miami Associate Professor Billie Grace Lynn exhibits her piece "American Mask," but that certainly didn't prevent it from creating a backlash in social media. 

“I actually made the piece several years ago and showed it a long time ago and no one really said anything about it,” said Lynn.

Most people can acknowledge that discrimination has an insidious effect on the lives of minorities, even when it's unintentional. Those effects can include being passed over for jobs for which they are qualified or shut out of housing they can afford. And most people are painfully aware of the tensions between African-Americans and police.

Updated at 11:55 p.m. ET

President Trump launched into a lengthy defense of his comments on the violence in Charlottesville, Va., and again derided the news media at an impassioned campaign rally in Phoenix.

Updated at 4:53 p.m. ET

A small number of right-wing "Free Speech Rally" demonstrators disbanded early from Boston Common after they were confronted by thousands of counterprotesters shouting anti-Nazi and anti-KKK slogans.

Deborah Becker, a reporter with member station WBUR in Boston, said that "a few dozen" rally attendees were escorted from Parkman Bandstand by police and placed into police vehicles "for their own safety."

The University of Florida is cancelling a rally scheduled for September led by white nationalist Richard Spencer. But one of Spencer's supporters may be willing to take that up in court.

UF President Kent Fuchs released a statement Wednesday calling Spencer's rhetoric racist and repugnant. In that statement, Fuchs says the university decided to cancel the event due to safety concerns for the students on campus.

But Cameron Padgett, who helped organize the event, is threatening the university with a lawsuit to allow Spencer to speak.

Miami Herald

Florida ranks No. 2  in the list of U.S. states with the most active hate groups. The most recent Hate Map, put out regularly by the Southern Poverty Law Center, shows 63 hate groups operating from Pensacola to Miami. 

Updated at 4:59 p.m. ET

President Trump stood by his heavily criticized defense of monuments commemorating the Confederacy in a series of tweets Thursday morning. Trump said removing the statues of Confederate generals meant removing "beauty" — that would "never able to be comparably replaced" — from American cities. As he did in a Tuesday press conference, he also attempted to equate some Confederate generals with some of the Founding Fathers.

Strung together, the tweets read:

Florida Governor Rick Scott is repudiating President Donald Trump’s comments but not the president himself.  Trump in recent days has equated the actions of white nationalists with those of the men and women who marched in opposition.

Three former Florida correctional officers linked to the Ku Klux Klan have been convicted of first degree murder for planning to murder a black inmate in North Central Florida.

Members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff — high-ranking military officials who advise the president — appeared to distance themselves from President Trump by publicly condemning racism in the aftermath of Trump's comments about the attack in Charlottesville.

Trump has blamed "both sides" for the violence.

A majority of Americans think President Trump's response to the violence in Charlottesville, Va., was "not strong enough," according to an NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll.

Fifty-two percent of respondents said so, as compared with just over a quarter (27 percent) who thought it was strong enough.

At a theater in Charlottesville, Va., the mother of Heather Heyer issued a rallying cry.

"They tried to kill my child to shut her up," Susan Bro said. "Well, guess what. You just magnified her."

She invoked her daughter's famous Facebook post — "If you're not outraged, you're not paying attention."

The former president's message after the violence in Charlottesville, Va., was brief, but it hit the right note for many.

"No one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin or his background or his religion ... ," Barack Obama tweeted, accompanied by a photo of himself, jacket slung over his shoulder, smiling at four young children gathered at a windowsill.

Associated Press

The University of Florida is refusing to allow white nationalist leader Richard Spencer to speak on campus next month, citing “serious concerns” about safety in the aftermath of a deadly weekend clash in Charlottesville, Va.

In a message to staff Wednesday morning, university President Kent Fuchs said the decision to deny the National Policy Institute's request to rent space on campus came “after assessing potential risks” with campus, state, local and federal law enforcement officials.

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