Presidency

It's a no-go from Oprah for 2020.

Oprah Winfrey, the media mogul and actress who spurred buzz of a White House bid with her stirring speech at the Golden Globes this month, told InStyle that she isn't interested in being president.

"I've always felt very secure and confident with myself in knowing what I could do and what I could not. ... I don't have the DNA for it," Winfrey told the magazine.

If President Trump's first year in office seemed chaotic from a staffing perspective, there's a reason. Turnover among top-level staff in the Trump White House was off the charts, according to a new Brookings Institution report.

As President Trump approaches his first anniversary of taking office, he and others are taking stock.

"2017 was a year of tremendous achievement, monumental achievement, actually," Trump told members of his Cabinet last week. "I don't think any administration has ever done what we've done and what we've accomplished in its first year."

The president has delivered on some of his major campaign promises. Other pledges are still works in progress, while some commitments have been quietly discarded.

As President Trump approaches the one-year anniversary of his inauguration, a majority of Americans think that his first year in office has been a failure and that he has divided the nation.

NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll data released Thursday finds that Americans deemed Trump's first year a failure, 53 percent to 40 percent. And by an almost 2-to-1 ratio (61 percent to 32 percent), Americans said they believe Trump has divided the country since his election.

Trust in the institutions that have been the pillars of U.S. politics and capitalism is crumbling.

That is one finding from the latest NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll, which shows that Americans have limited confidence in its public schools, courts, organized labor and banks — and even less confidence in big business, the presidency, the political parties and the media.

Americans love Oprah Winfrey — they just don't necessarily want her to run for president.

In a head-to-head matchup with President Trump, Winfrey would win 50 to 39 percent, according to a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll.

But when asked if they want Winfrey to run for president, a majority (54 percent) said they don't want her to do so, with 35 percent saying they do want her to run.

Updated at 6:58 p.m. ET

Friday President Trump had his first physical exam since taking office — a move that could offer a rare public snapshot of the 71-year-old leader's health.

"The President's physical exam today at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center went exceptionally well," Dr. Ronny Jackson said in a statement released by the White House. "The President is in excellent health and I look forward to briefing some of the details on Tuesday."

If a refugee commits a crime, will a federal judge have blood on his hands?

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Department of Defense

On Nov. 2, 1968, President Lyndon B. Johnson made a private phone call to a friend of Richard Milhous Nixon, and bluntly accused the Republican presidential candidate of treason.

Treason.

There was no doubt, said Johnson, that Nixon’s campaign team was trying to scupper peace talks aimed at ending the Vietnam War. They were afraid that peace in Vietnam would help Nixon’s Democratic rival, Hubert Humphrey, to clinch the election.

Obama's Immigration Remarks In State Of The Union Not Enough, Locals Say

Jan 29, 2014
Laguardia Cross / 1Miami

 

More than a dozen people crowded the Salvadorean restaurant La Pupusa Factory in Little Havana to hear President Obama's remarks on immigration reform during his State of the Union address Tuesday.

They were part of a community forum with a focus on immigration reform and equal rights. After the address, there was mostly disappointment among the crowd.

"There was barely a mention of immigration reform. ... There was nothing that he said that pointed in that direction and we are all very disappointed about it," said Camilo Mejilla, one of the organizers. 

Princeton University Press

11/04/13 - Monday’s Topical Currents reflects on the 2012 Presidential Election, with political science professors John Side and Lynn Vavreck. Commentators and pundits quickly gave reasons for President Obama’s win . . . but detailed study by academics adds a dose of reality to the result. They drew on scads of data about voters, media coverage and candidate advertising.

Florida: A President's Best Friend and Worst Enemy

Nov 13, 2012
http://www.drjimclark.com/

The  Miami Book Fair International is happening through the weekend , and all week, we're hearing from some of the Florida authors appearing at Miami-Dade College for the fair.