politics

The Supreme Court, in King v. Burwell, will soon decide whether more than a million Floridians will lose subsidies they rely on to buy insurance on HealthCare.gov.  

Alex Gonzalez / WLRN

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush ended the worst-kept secret in Florida politics Monday: He’s running for president.

Bush has maintained a will-he-or-won’t-he flirtation with officially entering the Republican 2016 field since he announced he was "actively exploring" a bid six months ago.

But he knew he wasn’t fooling anyone -- and jumped into the race just two minutes into his speech at Miami Dade College's Kendall campus.
 
The nation's largest college “is just the place to be in the campaign that begins today," Bush said.

World Affairs Council of Philadelphia / www.flickr.com/creativecommons/by-2.0/

It's likely not news to you that Miami is ground zero for two of the most watched Republicans in this cycle's presidential contest. Remember the excitement back in April when Sen. Marco Rubio officially hopped in the race at the Freedom Tower?

“Grounded by the lessons of our history, but inspired by the promise of our future, I announce my candidacy for president of the United States,” Rubio said.

Lightblb on Flickr

"Hmm?" answered Sean Spicer to whether a Republican presidential nominee has to win in Florida in order to win the White House.

Spicer is the chief strategist and communications director for the Republican National Committee. The RNC is not picking a favorite among the growing list of Republicans vying for their party's presidential nomination. But the party, like its Democratic counterpart, knows Florida's growing importance to the 2016 presidential race.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush became a Republican presidential candidate Monday.

Education has been a signature issue for Bush. He helped start Florida’s first charter school. He says schools and teachers should be judged on student performance. He pushed for vouchers for private schools.

And he spent most of his time since leaving the Florida governor’s office advocating for his brand of school reform.

10 Things You Should Know About Marco Rubio

Jun 12, 2015
JIM LO SCALZO / EPA/LANDOV

Sen. Marco Rubio has his eye on the Oval Office.

He announced his bid for the Republican presidential race in April at the Freedom Tower in downtown Miami. The Freedom Tower was a symbolic (and strategic) choice: He appealed to the Cuban-American stronghold in Miami.

Rubio, a South Florida political wunderkind, was elected Florida’s youngest-ever state House speaker in 2006 at 35 years old. He was then elected senator in 2010.

10 Things You Should Know About Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush

Jun 12, 2015
World Affairs Council of Philadelphia/Flickr

Jeb Bush is expected to announce his entrance into the presidential race Monday at Miami Dade College’s Kendall campus.

In contrast to Sen. Marco Rubio’s announcement, which took place in the cramped but historic Freedom Tower, Bush is heading to a community college that has multiple campuses spread throughout Miami-Dade County.

Wikimedia / Illustration by Maria Murriel

The regular session of the Florida Legislature came to an abrupt end in late April as the House disagreed with the Senate over Medicaid expansion. The Senate wants to use federal dollars for expansion, while the House and Gov. Rick Scott want no expansion.

Lawmakers returned to Tallahassee last week for a special session to finish work on their one required duty: creating a state budget that goes into effect July 1.

Nina Agrawal

Gov. Rick Scott was in South Florida Monday to help release three endangered sea turtles into the ocean. The loggerhead turtles had been rehabilitated by the Miami Seaquarium and were released at Bill Baggs State Park in Key Biscayne.

Andrew Hertz, president and general manager of the Seaquarium, said the release was significant because the turtles were just getting to reproductive age. “They are the best hope for the next generation of sea turtles,” he said.

Zack Mccarthy / Flickr

Florida lawmakers are getting closer to a budget deal that will add more money for schools.

Florida schools would get $207 more per student if the Florida House agrees to a Senate education budget, or $7,097 per pupil.

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