politics

Chelsea Beck / NPR

Back in October, before his election, then-presidential candidate Donald Trump laid out a 100-Day Action Plan. He called it his "Contract With The American Voter." Among other things, it called for the full repeal and replacement of the Affordable Care Act, suspension of immigration from certain "terror-prone regions" and the lifting of "roadblocks" to let "infrastructure projects like the Keystone Pipeline move forward."

Donald Trump promised something new in American politics.

His strategists said his brash "America First" approach would bust up the old party identities and remake the Republican Party as a true populist "Workers Party."

But it was never perfectly clear exactly how he planned to do that — 100 days into his administration, here are five thoughts on what we know so far about Trumpism:

1. The early debate about Trumpism (and what that means)

As the first American president to be elected with no prior political or military experience, Donald Trump has had to adapt quickly to the responsibilities of public office.

Peter Haden / WLRN

U.S. Rep. Ted Deutch, D-Boca Raton, is sponsoring a constitutional amendment to take big money out of elections.

The 28th Amendment would limit individual political contributions, require them to be disclosed and throw out the the legal notion that corporations are “people.”

“In the Citizens United decision, the Supreme Court said that corporations and wealthy people can spend an unlimited amount of money to influence our elections,” Deutch said. “The only way that we can respond to return democracy back to the people is to amend the Constitution.”

WLRN

This week on The Florida Roundup...

WLRN's Tom Hudson was live from the Miami Book Fair with a panel of authors from across the state to ponder a future in the age of Trump. 

At his first news conference following his party's shocking loss at the ballot box last week, President Obama appeared to needle Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton's campaign for not paying enough attention to rural voters who eventually handed President-elect Donald Trump the upset victory.

"When your team loses, everybody gets deflated, and it's hard, and it's challenging," Obama said. "I think it's a healthy thing for the Democratic Party to go through some reflection."

Reince Priebus once joked about his job as chairman of the Republican National Committee that people assumed he must be miserable. But Priebus said he didn't see it that way. "I'm not pouring Bailey's in my cereal," he told CNN.

Now, as newly named chief of staff to President-elect Donald Trump, Priebus has his work cut out for him.

Priebus will have a large say in hiring West Wing staff, and will "be in charge of day to day operations," he told Fox News on Monday morning. He'll also have the president-elect's ear as a top adviser.

Trump Makes Final Push For South Florida's Vote

Nov 2, 2016
Katie Lepri / WLRN

Pink “Women for Trump” and red “Hispanics for Trump" signs were scattered through the crowd Tuesday afternoon as Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump spoke at Bayfront Park in downtown Miami.

Univision

Before Wynwood was the heart of hipster Miami, it was a Puerto Rican enclave. So Puerto Rican community leaders and business owners recently gathered there at Jimmy'z Kitchen for a campaign fundraiser.

This is the most contentious campaign season in memory, yet business goes on. Boat repairs, restaurants, banking -- you name it. Commerce continues despite the uncertainty of the election.

The economy consistently ranks as the biggest issue for most Americans. Taxes, regulations, health care, immigration even the combative tone of this election -- does the uncertainty of this election threaten to hurt or help business?

Walter Michot / Miami Herald

In 2012, Florida’s election results were decided by less than one percent. In 2000, fewer than 600 votes separated the candidates.

Today, Florida remains a swing state, with an especially high number of registered independents.

One in four registered voters in the state don’t declare any political party, making it the fastest growing political class in Florida.

So, who exactly are Florida's swing voters?

Miami Herald

 According to the Governor’s office, five cases of the Zika virus have been identified in Miami Beach. This as the tally of locally transmitted cases hits 36. So, what's new in the effort to find and stop it?

Also, from the U.S. Senate to county hall, early voting has begun for the August 30th primaries. A third party presidential candidate comes to town. And how truthful is this political season?

Protestors gathered Friday in Stuart near the private land visited by Senator Marco Rubio during his tour viewing areas hit by the algae.
Jill Roberts

This week on The Florida Roundup...

New details are emerging about the horror inside the Pulse nightclub massacre in Orlando. Transcripts of police communications also raise questions about the  law enforcement response. Why is it important to understand the police decisions involved, and what do these records indicate?

Listen here: 

AP

On Thursday, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a a one sentence ruling announcing, in fact, that it couldn't make a decision on President Obama’s executive action on immigration. The action, signed in 2014, would have granted temporary legal status and work permits to as many as 4 million parents of U.S. citizens who entered the U.S. illegally prior to 2010. For those millions waiting and hoping the court would rule in favor of the executive action, what happens now?

Listen to that discussion below:

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