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The Obama administration and the state have reached an agreement to continue funding the hospital Low-Income Pool for two more years but at a much lower cost.

Charles Trainor Jr / Miami Herald

    

Today on the Florida Roundup, Jeb Bush officially enters the race for the White House. How will he compete with Marco Rubio for the Hispanic vote in Florida?

Protestors in Little Haiti called on the president to take action on a Dominican Republic court ruling which may lead to mass deportation of Haitians living there.

Earl Leatherberry/flickr

Florida voters passed Amendment 1 last November, and funding to carry out the amendment was considered a priority when lawmakers went into the regular session in March. The amendment is also known as the Water and Land Conservation Initiative.

For the next 20 years, the amendment requires that one–third of the revenue from a real estate tax known as documentary stamps goes toward environmental preservation.

Alex Gonzalez / WLRN

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush ended the worst-kept secret in Florida politics Monday: He’s running for president.

Bush has maintained a will-he-or-won’t-he flirtation with officially entering the Republican 2016 field since he announced he was "actively exploring" a bid six months ago.

But he knew he wasn’t fooling anyone -- and jumped into the race just two minutes into his speech at Miami Dade College's Kendall campus.
 
The nation's largest college “is just the place to be in the campaign that begins today," Bush said.

World Affairs Council of Philadelphia / www.flickr.com/creativecommons/by-2.0/

It's likely not news to you that Miami is ground zero for two of the most watched Republicans in this cycle's presidential contest. Remember the excitement back in April when Sen. Marco Rubio officially hopped in the race at the Freedom Tower?

“Grounded by the lessons of our history, but inspired by the promise of our future, I announce my candidacy for president of the United States,” Rubio said.

Lightblb on Flickr

"Hmm?" answered Sean Spicer to whether a Republican presidential nominee has to win in Florida in order to win the White House.

Spicer is the chief strategist and communications director for the Republican National Committee. The RNC is not picking a favorite among the growing list of Republicans vying for their party's presidential nomination. But the party, like its Democratic counterpart, knows Florida's growing importance to the 2016 presidential race.

10 Things You Should Know About Marco Rubio

Jun 12, 2015
JIM LO SCALZO / EPA/LANDOV

Sen. Marco Rubio has his eye on the Oval Office.

He announced his bid for the Republican presidential race in April at the Freedom Tower in downtown Miami. The Freedom Tower was a symbolic (and strategic) choice: He appealed to the Cuban-American stronghold in Miami.

Rubio, a South Florida political wunderkind, was elected Florida’s youngest-ever state House speaker in 2006 at 35 years old. He was then elected senator in 2010.

10 Things You Should Know About Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush

Jun 12, 2015
World Affairs Council of Philadelphia/Flickr

Jeb Bush is expected to announce his entrance into the presidential race Monday at Miami Dade College’s Kendall campus.

In contrast to Sen. Marco Rubio’s announcement, which took place in the cramped but historic Freedom Tower, Bush is heading to a community college that has multiple campuses spread throughout Miami-Dade County.

Vlado / Flickr CC

Today on the Florida Roundup, Miami-Dade County moves forward with a proposal to issue a $100 civil citation for possession of 20 grams or less of marijuana. The plan is part of a broader one to curb arrests in low-income areas as well as allowing for police to prioritize their patrolling. Miami Beach's Commission is considering a similar measure.

JEBIO 2016

Wikimedia / Illustration by Maria Murriel

The regular session of the Florida Legislature came to an abrupt end in late April as the House disagreed with the Senate over Medicaid expansion. The Senate wants to use federal dollars for expansion, while the House and Gov. Rick Scott want no expansion.

Lawmakers returned to Tallahassee last week for a special session to finish work on their one required duty: creating a state budget that goes into effect July 1.

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