Parkland shooting

Associated Press

The Florida Parent Teacher Association (PTA) temporarily suspended the operations of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Parent Teacher Student Association (PTSA) on Monday in order to conduct an audit of the association’s finances, according to a news release.

Peter Haden / WLRN

Dozens of activists staged a “die-in” near President Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate in West Palm Beach Tuesday on the second anniversary of the mass shooting at Pulse nightclub in Orlando that killed 49 people.

MSD Public Safety Commission
Riane Roldan / WLRN

During the first five minutes of the state's second Marjory Stoneman Douglas Public Safety Commission meeting, the chair of the group, Pinellas County Sheriff Bob Gualtieri, read a letter from Andrew Pollack, announcing his resignation from the commission. 


C.M. Guerrero / Miami Herald

On Feb. 15 — the day after the school shooting in Parkland — Fred Guttenberg stood on stage at the amphitheater in Pine Trails Park, expressing shock and anguish over the loss of his daughter, Jaime.

“I don’t know what I do next,” he said that night. “My wife is home. We are broken.”

Broward County Schools

Scot Peterson, the school resource officer receiving the brunt of the blame for not doing more during the Feb. 14 school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, said things happened too fast for him to act cowardly.

Also, Peterson said during an interview shown Tuesday morning on NBC's "Today," he thought the gunshots coming from the 1200 building were more likely from a sniper, as in the case of last year's Las Vegas mass shooting.

Instead, former Stoneman Douglas student Nikolas Cruz was unleashing the gunshots inside the building.

Peter Haden / WLRN

A phone call about a possible hostage situation in Parkland on Tuesday morning led police officers to swarm the home of one of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School's most outspoken student activists.

It turned out to be a prank called "swatting" — an illegal hoax call increasingly employed as a harassment tactic.

David Santiago / Miami Herald

Enacting gun control has been the main focus for some survivors of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting — and some parents of those who died.

Peter Haden / WLRN

Survivors of the February shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School have announced their next push to end gun violence: a cross-country voter drive.

Sam Turken / WLRN

Gun violence activists gathered in Miami this weekend as part of a national campaign to honor victims of shootings. 

  

Three disturbing cellphone videos recorded by Parkland shooter Nikolas Cruz before the Valentine's Day rampage were released Wednesday as evidence for the prosecution in their case against Cruz. The videos demonstrate the shooter's premeditation.

“And when you see me on the news, you’ll know who I am," Cruz is captured saying.

But what causes school shooters to commit such a heinous act? 

Nick Nehamas and David Ovalle are reporters for the Miami Herald. Dr. Peter Landman is a psychologist and author of the book “School Shooters: Understanding High School, College, and Adult Perpetrators.” The Broward State Attorney’s Office released three disturbing cellphone videos made by the confessed Parkland shooter Nikolas Cruz.

Late last year, Republican State Senator Denise Grimsley, who represents Florida’s 26th District, filed legislation that would allow telecommunication providers to block robo-calls. “The Florida Call-Blocking Act” will go into effect July 1.

The brother of Parkland school shooter Nikolas Cruz will be allowed to start a new life — out of state, with a new home and job.

A Broward judge allowed 18-year-old Zachary Cruz, who is under court supervision for trespassing at the school his brother attacked, to transfer his probation to Virginia. That's where he'll be under the care of Nexus Services, a company that says its helps people rebuild their lives after incarceration.

Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

On the afternoon of Feb. 14, Fawn Patterson got a call from her daughter telling her to come to the hospital.

Political ads in Georgia's Republican gubernatorial primary this year may be the most charged of any intraparty battle around the country, especially when it comes to guns.

One ad shows former state Sen. Hunter Hill at a shooting range loading one gun, eyes steady on the camera, and firing another.

"We don't need a carry permit," Hill says in the ad. "The only thing we need as Americans is the U.S. Constitution. And as governor, I won't give an inch on our Second Amendment."

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