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Nancy Klingener / WLRN

Key West is known for celebrating its history. But until recently, the graves of two of the island's most influential African-American citizens were unmarked.

Now that's been rectified by the efforts of the city — which runs the cemetery — and the Historic Florida Keys Foundation, a nonprofit that raises money for restoration from cemetery tours.

Miami Herald Archive

Representatives for two charter schools that illegally loaned public money to schools outside Miami-Dade County gave their word to the MDCPS School Board Tuesday that they plan to get it back. 

  A new study has found that even while wage increases for women in Miami-Dade outpaced men, women still make less in the workplace.

The study called “The Status of Women in Miami-Dade County” is the first of its kind for the county commission to look at the financial well-being of women.

Pope Francis is calling on those who use and control the media to avoid disinformation and "the sickness of coprophilia" — comparing a love of scandal to an abnormal interest in feces that can also include elements of sexual arousal.

An obsession with scandal can do great harm, Francis said Wednesday, in remarks that also cited people's tendency toward coprophagia (the eating of feces).

A fake US Embassy operated for 10 years in Ghana

7 hours ago
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Luc Gnago

For the last 10 years, Ghana had two US embassies. One is an imposing, high-security building, surrounded by wide lawns and palm trees. The other was a small office building covered in peeling paint.

And while both of them issued documents meant to grant permission to travel to the United States, only the first did so legally and with the approval of Washington, DC.

The other "embassy" was an elaborate scam, run to exploit people from across West Africa hoping to travel to the States. People would be lured to the fake embassy and charged for travel documents.

As Donald Trump continues to court controversy via Twitter, Fox News host Megyn Kelly tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross that the president-elect "really does need to be aware of the power that he has when he releases these tweets."

Time magazine has named President-elect Donald Trump as the 2016 Person of the Year, a title Trump called "a tremendous honor" in an interview on the Today show.

Trump was selected from a shortlist that included prior winners Mark Zuckerberg and Vladimir Putin, as well as first-time candidates the Flint water crisis whistleblowers and Beyoncé Knowles.

The Florida Department of Law Enforcement wants to revise a law further cracking down on sex offenders that was slated to take effect a couple months ago.

Tai Boxley needs a hysterectomy. The 34-year-old single mother has uterine prolapse, a condition that occurs when the muscles and ligaments supporting the uterus weaken, causing severe pain, bleeding and urine leakage.

Boxley and her 13-year-old son have health insurance through her job as an administrative assistant in Tulsa, Okla. But the plan has a deductible of $5,000 apiece, and Boxley's doctor said he won't do the surgery until she prepays her share of the cost.

Is Obamacare really a creation of the "liberal elite?"  And have things gotten worse in Cuba for dissidents since Fidel Castro stepped down from office? WUSF's Steve Newborn digs into those claims with Allison Graves of PolitiFact Florida.

Repealing President Barack Obama's health care law without a clear replacement risks making nearly 30 million people uninsured, according to a study released Wednesday.

Alex Jones has a following. His radio show is carried on more than 160 stations, and he has more than 1.8 million subscribers on YouTube.

And he claims to have the ear of the next president of the United States.

Jones is also one of the nation's leading promoters of conspiracy theories — some of which take on lives of their own. He has been a chief propagator of untrue and wild claims about a satanic sex trafficking ring run by one of Hillary Clinton's top advisers out of a pizzeria in Washington, D.C.

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Luke MacGregor/Reuters

The spike of hate incidents from coast to coast in recent weeks is alarming. In the 10 days following the election of Donald Trump, the Southern Poverty Law Center recorded more than 800 real-world incidents — and that doesn’t even begin to include instances of online harassment.

George Soros, the Holocaust survivor and billionaire philanthropist, wants to track — and combat — this increase in hate incidents. Last month, he announced he would donate $10 million to fight hate crimes nationwide.

In the quest to help the poor, it's difficult to know whose needs are the greatest. Without clear data, it's tough to know who to help first.

The traditional way to look for the poorest of the poor is with household surveys. That's the primary source of data for policy decisions, but it has drawbacks.

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