news

"You are not grieving alone. We are all grieving with you. The entire country is grieving with you," is the message that a group of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High graduates from around the country sent to the survivors of the school shooting via a video shared on social media. 

Courtesy

More than 500 people, classmates and community members filed into Church by the Glades in Coral Springs on Friday to pay their final respects to Helena Ramsay, a young scholar who loved to rescue cats.

Ramsay was one of 17 victims killed at Marjorie Stoneman Douglas High. She had just turned 17 years old in January. 

She was described as a voracious reader and she loved crafting.

At her celebration service at Church by the Glades, her big brother Ellis Ramsay eulogized her.

Miami Herald Archive

Florida’s governor and state lawmakers each released plans for improving school safety following last week’s shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, including major changes to gun laws and more money for mental health.

Courtesy

Senate Minority Leader Oscar Braynon wants to create a $10 million program that would reimburse trauma centers for care provided to victims of mass shootings, and Senate President Joe Negron said he will support the effort. 

Braynon wants to create a fund in the Attorney General’s Office, with money coming from a portion of fees collected from new or renewed concealed-weapons licenses. The program would reimburse trauma centers that treat victims of mass shootings, such as the Feb. 14 attack at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland that left 17 people dead. 

Gerald Herbert / AP

The shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School has developed into a narrative of missed warning signs.

Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel announced the latest admission on Thursday. The school resource officer on duty Scot Peterson did not enter the building where alleged shooter Nikolas Cruz had opened fire.

Adrianne Gonzalez / WLRN News

Student survivors of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland organized a protest for gun reform outside the Biergarten Restaurant in Boca Raton Thursday morning. It was one of several demonstrations around the country targeting politicians who have accepted donations from the NRA.

In the wake of the shootings at Marjorie Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, accusations are going around at a fast clip. 

Peter Haden / WLRN

Hundreds of people filled Church of the Glades in Coral Springs Thursday to honor slain Stoneman Douglas High School assistant football coach Aaron Feis.

Feis, 37, was killed in the Feb. 14 mass shooting at the school. Witnesses say he was shot as he ran at the shooter and pushed students out of harm’s way.

Ever the coach, Feis’s memorial service opened with the singing of the national anthem.

Matias Ocner / Miami Herald

Not even two weeks after a shooter fired more than 100 bullets in the hallways of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, students and staff are returning to the campus fearful of emotional triggers that could force them to relive the traumatic event.

Anytime someone is booked into a county jail for a crime in the U.S., his or her fingerprints are automatically sent to federal authorities. If the suspect happens to be an undocumented immigrant, what happens next could depend on where the jail is located.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement often asks jails to hold undocumented people, so federal agents can pick them up and put them into deportation proceedings.

Updated at 1:50 p.m. ET

During a meandering speech Friday morning at the Conservative Political Action Conference, President Trump doubled down on arming some teachers and school personnel after last week's shooting at a Parkland, Fla., high school that killed 17 people.

Some of the most inappropriate behaviors at the office, in Americans' minds, are also the most common — yet almost no one admits to them, in a new poll on workplace behavior from NPR and Ipsos.

Three executions were scheduled. Two were called off.

If the death sentences in Alabama, Texas and Florida had all gone ahead on Thursday night as originally planned, it would have marked the first time in eight years that three convicted killers were executed on the same day.

However, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott granted clemency to Thomas Whitaker, 38, commuting his sentence to life in prison. And late Thursday, the execution in Alabama of Doyle Lee Hamm was postponed after last minute legal wrangling pushed late into the evening.

In trying to clarify his Wednesday comments about arming teachers and other school personnel, President Trump, a day later, aligned himself even more closely with the National Rifle Association on the issue of teachers with guns and beefing up school security.

So much so, they seemed, at times, to be reading from the same script.

Here's how the day started — with NRA Executive Vice President and CEO Wayne LaPierre at the Conservative Political Action Conference, or CPAC (emphasis ours):

"Valentine's Day was a day of love, passion and friendships as Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School celebrated February 14, 2018 ..."

That's how the student journalists writing for the Eagle Eye, the newspaper at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, started their story about one of the deadliest mass shootings in modern history.

That first line flowed quickly for senior Christy Ma, but the rest of the article took days to write as she relived the events.

Pages