movies

A world zombified by George A. Romero

Jul 18, 2017
R
Susana Vera/Reuters

George A. Romero died on Sunday at the age of 77 after a battle with lung cancer. The Pittsburgh filmmaker was revered as the godfather of the modern zombie film. With "Night of the Living Dead" (1968), he set the rules for zombies that still hold fast today for many films about the undead. You must destroy the brain or remove the head to kill them. And if you get bit by one you become one and then you crave human flesh.

The director John Woo, whose filmography contains an aggregate body count in the quadruple digits, has frequently observed that action movies and musicals are close cousins. He's right about that, and I offer into evidence Edgar Wright's intoxicating new chase flick Baby Driver as Exhibit A.

Wonder Woman was a box office smash on its opening weekend, raking in more than $100 million domestically — a new record for a movie directed by a woman.

Deadline reported Monday that the final tally for the film was $103.1 million, even higher than the initial Sunday estimates.

That handily defeats the previous record for a movie directed by a woman — $85.1 million for Sam Taylor-Johnson's Fifty Shades of Grey.

For the first time in its roughly two decades of existence, a South Florida LGBT film festival will not use the words gay or lesbian in the title of its event.

The former MiFo LGBT Film Festival starts Friday under a new name: OUTshine Film Festival, with 65  movies over 10 days.

Mark Gilbert, chairman of the festival, spoke recently with WLRN about the rebranding of the event. He started by taking us back a bit to understand how we got to this point.

Due to a historic mix-up at this year’s Oscars, director Barry Jenkins wasn’t able to make the acceptance speech he wanted to. Now that the dust has settled, the FSU Film School grad is making that statement.

Well, excuse me while I throw away my first draft, won't you?

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

  The lack of new film incentives in Florida hasn't stopped one movie production from shooting some of its scenes in the state.

"The Leisure Seeker," starring Helen Mirren and Donald Sutherland, is set to shoot for several days in the keys later this month.

On Thursday, a casting call for extras drew Key Westers needed to play medical personnel, a wedding party and tourists.

There was no call for a parrot, but Mango was there anyway with her owners, Thane and Tami Gilliam.

FLIFF Director Gregory Von Hausch Celebrates a Cinematic Life

Nov 9, 2015

As the 30th Anniversary of the Fort Lauderdale International Film Festival draws near, Executive Director Gregory von Hausch discusses how movies have always shaped his life.

03/27/15 - Next time on South Florida Arts Beat, our classical contributor, Charles Greenfield speaks with Executive Director Carlene Sawyer about upcoming Dranoff International Two Piano Foundation events and Bang The Ivories.

Creative Commons / Flickr user Joe Anzalone

The Miami-based independent movie theater O Cinema will open its third location this fall, in Miami Beach. The City of Miami Beach commission anonymously approved an agreement Wednesday allowing O Cinema to take over management of the Byron-Carlyle Theater.

Julia Duba / WLRN

Oscar-winning actor and comedian Robin Williams died this week.

Williams had many iconic roles, and he filmed one of his great performances right here in South Florida.

"The Birdcage" is set in The Carlyle hotel on South Beach. 

T. Bernier

Beam everybody down, Scotty.  Or to downtown Miami, to be exact.

From Jan. 17 to 19,  the Hyatt Regency is set to be invaded by all kinds of interplanetary voyagers and time-travelers -- courtesy of a film festival celebrating all things sci-fi.

About 50 science fiction, fantasy and horror films from around the world will be screened at the Miami International Science Fiction Film Festival this weekend.

MiSciFi, as it’s called by its founders, is being billed as the first of its kind in Miami.

Solomon Northup was born free in early-19th-century upstate New York. He lived the life of a respected and elegant musician until 1841, when he was lured South by the promise of a lucrative stint playing his fiddle in a traveling circus.

In Washington, D.C. — in the shadow of the Capitol — Northup was drugged. When he came to, he was in chains: a slave headed for the hellish world of plantation life. Only the hope of being reunited with his beloved wife and children kept him going.

Chloe Herring

Twenty-one cars gathered on Oct. 11 for the grand opening of the new Blue Starlite drive-in theater in Wynwood, and to catch a new spin on the blast-from-the-past movie classic “Back to the Future.”

Guests to the Blue Starlite were greeted by owner Josh Frank’s staff, and cars were personally escorted. As night fell, children made their way to the hoods of their parents’ cars and affectionate lovers held hands. Movie-goers were encouraged to bring their own snacks, but concession was provided accompanied by sounds of vintage concession advertisements.

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