Miami-Dade County Public Schools

Judge Sides With State On Charter School Standards

Jul 24, 2017

Rejecting arguments of charter schools, an administrative law judge Friday upheld a plan that would make charter schools ineligible for state construction and facilities money if they have “D” performance grades in two consecutive years.

AP Photo/Lynne Sladky

This week on The Florida Roundup...

The Florida Department of Education released the latest school grades for the 2016-17 year and the results are astounding. The percentage of schools that earned an "A" or "B" jumped from 47 percent the previous year to 57 percent and the number of failing schools decreased by more than half. 

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

In the middle of the school year, Hayden Dallip was at home in Miami Gardens when he got a call from his seventh-grade daughter. “She was crying—she said, 'Daddy, hurry up and come to the school.' " The phone call home came after a fight with another student. “I said, 'what’s going on, what’s going on?' She said, ‘Please come to the school because they suspended me,” Dallip recounted.

Youtube

In the 2014-2015 school year, Madison Middle School in Miami reported 55 fights to the Florida Department of Education (FLDOE)—nearly one for every three days school was in session. The very next year, that number fell to zero, even though one fight made the news after a student landed in the hospital with a broken jaw.

John Kral / Miami Herald


Pat Sullivan AP / Miami Herald

There has been a lot of attention on the issue of sexual assault on college campuses in recent years. There was an alleged case of rape on the University of Miami two years ago that ended with the firing of a professor and a lawsuit from an accused student.

Courtesy Freddie Young

The iconic images of school integration show determined black students making their way through jeering white crowds, just to take their seats in class. And at the head of those classes, teachers who were part of a workforce every bit as segregated as the student body.

Broward County Public Schools

Around 2:30 p.m. last Tuesday, Broward County School Board Chair Abby Freedman faced an auditorium full of empty chairs, reading through a list of 17 scheduled speakers — “ Terry Preuss, Liliana Ruido, Julie Ganas, Joan King,” she said.

No one was there: On the school board’s written agenda for the meeting, public comment wasn’t supposed to begin for more than two hours, at 5 p.m.

Miami Herald

Nearly two years into Miami-Dade Schools’ signature alternative-to-suspension program, it’s hard to measure the impact of the heavily touted Student Success Centers.

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

Police and government officials from Guatemala have been in Miami all week visiting schools and shadowing Miami-Dade schools police as part of a training program organized by the U.S. State department.

On Friday, they stood by and observed as MDCPS schools police cued mock explosions, students in gory makeup and a canine unit as part of hostage scenario training drill unfolding at Treasure Island Elementary School in North Bay Village.

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

 


Editor's Note:

WLRN News hired freelance reporter Susannah Nesmith to report the following story. WLRN News did not direct any of her reporting and the story was edited by NPR. That's because WLRN News itself is a subject of the reporting. 

The Miami-Dade School District has proposed taking over operations of WLRN, South Florida’s public radio and television stations.

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

High school seniors started applying for financial aid three months early this year, thanks to changes introduced by the Department of Education to give families more time weigh their options.

At G. Holmes Braddock High School in Kendall, college advisor Maria Mendoza is walking a group of 12th graders through the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA. “If you don’t have a FAFSA ID, you’re going to request two: one for you and one for your parents,” she says, making the rounds as students input information on laptops. 

Nadege Green / WLRN

Olympic gold medalist Brianna Rollins returned to Miami Northwestern Senior High where as a young freshman she got her first introduction to track & field.

She was showered with plaques, certificates and a proclamation that Sept. 15 will forever be known as Brianna Rollins Day. 

The admittedly shy athlete sported a white USA jersey and around her neck, her gold medal.

Creative Commons via Flickr / Victor Björkund (https://flic.kr/p/hPKtwF)

Everyone has a right to an education at least until high school, right?

As Anthony Espinoza found out, it’s not so simple, especially when you hit 16. At that age, young people can choose to drop out of school. But Anthony wanted back in school after he had to leave the magnet school he attended because his grades were suffering following dozens of absences and tardies.

Anthony tries to figure out exactly what happened to him and figure out what to do next. Listen to his story:

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