Miami Book Fair International

 

 

It feels like a high-speed chase west on the ironically named Dolphin Expressway, veering south on what follows as a seamless string of highway on the "Palmetto," the Don Shula Expressway and the Ronald Reagan Turnpike, all certifiable assaults on the nervous system.

Chabeli Herrera

For the past three months, WLRN and the Miami Book Fair have been challenging locals to write a short story -- really short. 

Participants were asked to submit a story short enough to fit on a Post-it note, creating their own Post-{L}its

Nearly 600 submissions later, on topics covering South Florida and beyond, the favorites of the bunch will get their moment to shine at this year's Miami Book Fair. 

Courtesy Daniel Shoer Roth

In one respect, the late Roman Catholic Archbishop Agustín Román was just like many of his fellow Cuban exiles he ministered to for almost half a century in Miami.

As long as the communist regime that expelled him and so many other priests at gunpoint in the 1960s remained in power, Román would never return there. And until he died in 2012, he never did.

Courtesy

The Miami Book Fair International has announced some of the names in its lineup of authors. 

Punk poet Patti Smith will kick off the fair’s 32nd edition, which runs from Nov. 15-22 at Miami Dade College’s Wolfson Campus. Smith will discuss her latest memoir “M Train” on Nov. 15 in MDC’s Chapman Conference Center.

The Winners Of #6WordsMiami

Nov 28, 2014
Courtesy of the Book Fair / WLRN

The Miami Book Fair International, in partnership with WLRN, asked for your six-word Miami-influenced stories. Now, after reading more than 4,000 entries, the pile was narrowed down to six finalists. 

Those six were selected and printed as a limited-edition postcard set, combining the #6WordsMiami stories with original photographs by award-winning Miami Herald photographer Carl Juste.

On Nov. 19, #6WordsMiami writers joined WLRN's Alicia Zuckerman at The Swamp to share their six-word stories.  Scroll down to see the set of commemorative postcards. 

  

Miami Book Fair International / Courtesy

South Florida knows how to throw a party. And it better, considering how important hospitality is to the regional economy. From conferences and conventions to fairs and festivals, the event business picks up as temperatures up north drop. Some are for out-of-towners exclusively, others celebrate South Florida for South Floridians.

To get a sense of the economics and local emotions involved, The Sunshine Economy spoke with the driving forces behind four big events that dot the South Florida map.

Copyright by Judy Blume and used only with her written permission. Not to be further reproduced or distributed except with her permission.

When I was in elementary school, I wrote an "autobiography" called "I Want to Be Like Judy." It had a pink construction paper cover and came in second in the school library contest. I never imagined that  30-something years later, Judy would say to me, "Let's take a selfie!" (See our virtual tour - link below.) I loved all her books, but "Starring Sally J. Freedman as Herself" was one of my very favorites. I read it over and over. Ten times? Fifteen?  

Johns Hopkins Krieger School of Arts and Sciences / http://history.jhu.edu/directory/nathan-connolly/

N.D.B. Connolly grew up in South Florida and couldn't wait to leave. That's when he realized just how attached he was to the region. That's also when he started to look at the history of Miami and how for more than a century Jim Crow laws made life in the Magic City painful and difficult for African-Americans.

Wikimedia Commons

Mark DeNote doesn't teach his middle school history students about beer. But he did write Florida's history of "the drink of the working class" in his book, "The Great Florida Craft Beer Guide."

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Say you walk into an office building. On the reception desk is a nice, lush, green-leafed plant with white dots on it. You think, “how nice and outdoorsy.”

Chances are it's a deathly, toxic plant called a "dumb cane."

That's one of the tidbits included in Michael Largo's most recent publication, "The Big, Bad Book of Botany." It’s an encyclopedia-style book about botany sprinkled with surprising, funny and historical tales of plants.

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