Miami

C.M. Guerrero / Miami Herald

COMMENTARY

Its economy relies to an absurd extent on the low-wage tourism sector. Because it lacks higher-wage, tech-oriented jobs, its average citizens struggle to bridge the chasm between their incomes and their exorbitant living costs.

But so what? It’s a sunny town on a bay with muy caliente Latin flavor. The visitors and their money will keep coming and keep the place afloat. Besides, it’s got more important things to worry about – like a mortal political enemy 90 miles away.

Human Rights Watch

Human Rights Watch, one of the world’s major international human rights organizations, inaugurated its new office in Miami on Tuesday night.  But if you think it’s here just to keep an eye on Latin America and the Caribbean – guess again.

Some might ask why it took the New York-based Human Rights Watch so long to come to Miami, given the hemisphere’s chronic human rights issues, like this week's debate on the Venezuela crisis at the Organization of American States. HRW’s executive director Ken Roth says he understands if people do ask.

CHABELI HERRERA / MIAMI HERALD

This week on The Florida Roundup...

Miami-Dade County has inked a deal with Airbnb for the home-sharing company to collect and pay hotel taxes. Yet, the city of Miami and Miami Beach continue to pushback against the service and its hosts.

YouTube (left); Tim Padgett(right) / WLRN.org

For some of his countrymen, Venezuelan cross-country skier Adrián Solano’s performance in Finland last week was uplifting – even though it involved a lot of falling down. To others it was mucha pena. Really embarrassing.

Well, excuse me while I throw away my first draft, won't you?

Jessica Meszaros

This week on The Florida Roundup...

Miami is the second worst city in the Country, next to San Francisco, when it comes to finding affordable hosing. So if you're looking to buy a home in Miami-Dade, where do you go? The Miami Herald has a new tool to help people find homes to fit their price-range. We speak with the reporter behind the special report Nick Nehamaas. 

Tim Padgett / WLRN.org

It’s Valentine's Day. And once again, Latin America is front and center: Colombian roses. Venezuelan chocolate. Argentine tango.

But here’s another Latin love link guys like Erik Calviño want you to consider: Caribbean cigars.

Katie Lepri / WLRN.org

Khizr Khan is the immigrant Gold Star father who denounced presidential candidate Donald Trump at the Democratic National Convention. Before receiving an award Friday night in Miami, he spoke with WLRN about immigration controversies national – and local.

Pakistani-Americans Khan and his wife lost their U.S. Army officer son Humayun Khan in Iraq when he confronted a suicide bomber. Last year they became the face of opposition to Donald Trump’s presidential campaign rhetoric against immigrants and Muslims like themselves.

Emily Michot / Miami Herald

The feud between President-elect Donald Trump and Georgia Congressman and civil rights icon John Lewis continued Monday in South Florida.

The dispute started last week when Lewis said Trump is “not a legitimate president” because of Russia’s alleged role in helping him get elected. Trump then Tweeted that Lewis is “all talk…no action.” At a Martin Luther King Day breakfast at Jungle Island in Miami, Lewis was defiant:

“Never give up," he told an audience that included young African-American scholarship winners of the 5000 Role Models of Excellence Project.

Workouts Jam To South Beach Rhythm At 305 Fitness In NYC

Jan 2, 2017
Alex Gonzalez / WLRN

Sadie Kurzban likes to warm up her fitness dance class with a pep talk.

“We’re in it together,” she tells 30 women gathered in a 1,500-square-foot studio. “There’s nothing to worry about. You’re in good hands.”

PBS

This week on The Florida Roundup...

A new study done by Florida International University's Metropolitan Center has found that despite steady wage increases for women in Miami-Dade County, women still make less in the workplace. 

Tim Padgett / WLRN.org

HAVANA - When the first commercial flight between the U.S. and Cuba in more than half a century touched down in Santa Clara in August, the JetBlue plane from Fort Lauderdale was met with cheers and water-cannon salutes.

When the first commercial flight between Miami and Havana in more than half a century landed at José Martí International Airport Monday morning, the American Airlines 737 taxied quietly to the terminal and unloaded 125 passengers wearing complimentary straw fedoras.

No confetti. No music. And it felt remarkably fitting.

David Santiago / El Nuevo Herald

Fidel Castro's death will no doubt spark a robust debate about what Cuba would be like today if he had never come to power in 1959.

But here's another important question: What would Miami be today without Castro and the thousands of exiles his communist revolution drove to South Florida?

Tim Padgett / WLRN.org

News of Fidel Castro’s death sent Cuban exiles old and young into the streets of Little Havana early this morning. Both generations recall Castro with a sense of betrayal - and his demise with a sense of hope.

80-year-old Ana Celia watched fellow Cuban exiles dance a conga line in front of the Versailles restaurant in Little Havana - some of them holding signs that read, "Go to Hell Fidel."

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