Miami

Al Diaz / AP

It was the first major story I ever covered here in Miami.

The first – and quite possibly the worst. But it’s worth recalling because it led us to the Cuba moment Miami is living right now.

This Sunday marks the 15th anniversary of the end of the Elián González drama – the ugly international custody battle that gave the cable news networks bizarre fodder for seven long months in 1999 and 2000.

Courtesy Peter Zimble

Part 2 of Cuba Online

Some people visit Cuba to drink up rum mojitos. Peter Zimble goes there to dream up web services.

“The woman who runs the apartment where I’m staying was lamenting that she had to walk my visa to a government office to register me as a guest,” Zimble told me by phone from Havana’s seaside Malecón. “It would be so much easier if there were an app for that.”

Tim Padgett / WLRN.org

Part 1 of Cuba Online

When Cuban bikini maker Victor Rodríguez visited Miami this month, he was on a pilgrimage – not just for bathing suits but for bandwidth.

The most important stop on Rodríguez’s schedule was lunch in Wynwood, Miami’s high-tech district, with Mel Valenzuela, who owns the online swimwear store Pretty Beachy.

Miami-Dade Transit

The entire Metromover system will be shut down this Saturday and Sunday. Miami-Dade Transit will provide free shuttles to replace the Metromover routes while upgrades and routine maintenance will force the closure.

Shuttle busses will run between Metromover stops every 10 to 15 minutes and, for the most part, follow the path of the Metromover tracks. Below is a map showing the exact stop locations.

Tom Rollo / IEFA/Grace Photography

Starting today, Miami is the home of yet another major hemispheric gathering. The International Economic Forum of the Americas has moved one of its biggest events here - from a South Florida neighbor.

The International Economic Forum of the Americas, or IEFA, has become a key platform for issues affecting the Western Hemisphere. The Montreal-based group used to hold its annual World Strategic Forum in Palm Beach County. But it aims to raise its profile now by taking advantage of Miami-Dade’s more Latin American atmosphere.

Ariana Cubillos / AP

Thirty years ago, when I was a graduate student in Caracas, I met a young Venezuelan socialist who introduced himself as Stalín.

“Yes, after the Russian,” he told me rather condescendingly – hoping to shock an American with the news that the Soviet dictator Josef Stalin was his namesake.

I didn't take the bait. But I did think of Stalín recently when Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro expressed his own admiration for “Comrade Stalin, who defeated Hitler.”

Miami Artist Captures Concerts In Drawings

Feb 13, 2015
Photo Courtesy of Brian Butler

In a crowd of concertgoers hidden in the shadows of a dimly lit venue, one man can’t help but stand out. Equipped with a pen and sketchbook, Brian Butler regularly claims a post near the many stages he comes across, ready to capture the diverse environments around him. 

Butler, originally a Massachusetts native and a Massachusetts College of Art and Design graduate, moved down to Miami about five years ago. He cites having seen rock legend Iggy Pop perform on the beach during Art Basel as part of the motivation for this move.

Junette Reyes / WLRN

Miami International Airport is acting Cupid as Valentine’s Day approaches, receiving and shipping over 90 percent of flowers imported to the United States.

The overwhelming number of flower shipments from South America and other regions bring up concerns of pests and plant diseases for the nation’s agricultural and floral industries.

Together, the Miami-Dade Aviation Department, LAN Cargo, and U.S. Customs and Border Protection go through an annual inspection process to prevent the industries from being harmed.

Lonny Paul / Flickr Creative Commons

Dear South Floridians, please don’t fire your guns into the sky to ring in the New Year.

That is the message from police departments and city officials across Miami-Dade County at an annual press conference for the campaign “One Bullet Kills The Party.”

On Tuesday, Miami-Dade Commissioner Audrey Edmonson warned one bullet fired into the air in celebration could injure or kill someone.

“Do not shoot up into the sky. When you shoot up into the sky of course that bullet comes down.”

CBS4 News

Nine people were shot and wounded at West Little River Park while playing basketball Monday afternoon.

The shooter allegedly opened fire from the passenger seat of a Nissan Maxima, Miami-Dade County police said.

A 16-year-old boy was shot in the head and is in critical but stable condition. Police say the other eight victims were shot in their extremities and are expected to fully recover.

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