Local politics

Miami Herald

Donald Trump is reshaping South Florida politics.

 

Longtime Republican Congresswoman Ileana Ros-Lehtinen decided not to run for re-election in a district that increasingly leans Democratic.

Congressional Candidates Fight To Stand Out In Miami

May 20, 2018
Adrianne Gonzalez / WLRN News

After holding a congressional seat for nearly 30 years, Republican Cuban-American Ileana Ros-Lehtinen of Florida's District 27 will be stepping down, and the seat is already heavily contested. Five Democrats, nine Republicans, and one Independent candidate are running to fill the seat as of May 2018.

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

There’s been a lot of interest and attention on national politics since the 2016 presidential election. But in the Florida Keys, politics has always served as a form of entertainment.

Javier Manjarres, the political consultant behind the conservative Shark Tank blog, is running for Congress against Parkland-area Rep. Ted Deutch.

Manjarres, whose interest in running against Deutch has been known for months, announced his candidacy Tuesday morning. In a press release touting his blue-collar background and “size 11 Ariat boots,” he criticized Deutch’s politics and accused him of trying to capitalize on February’s mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

Carl Juste / Miami Herald

Seymour Gelber stood in front of a packed chamber at Miami Beach City Hall where he once presided as mayor. Now 98, with a dose of pride and humor, he swore his son Dan into the office he once held, commending him for his record of public service.

Seymour Gelber pointed out that even though Dan Gelber, 56, has held weighty positions in public life — federal prosecutor and a top lawmaker in Tallahassee — he’s never taken himself too seriously.

Donald Trump frequently boasts about starting a movement, and sociologists say they are seeing unprecedented grass-roots activism across the country. They credit Trump for inspiring people to become politically engaged on the right — and even more so on the left. And many of those activists are brand new to the scene.

Groups Settle Lawsuit Over Broward County Ballots

Oct 29, 2014
John O'Connor / WLRN

A group challenging a Broward County ballot design they say is confusing has settled a lawsuit with the county’s Supervisor of Elections.

Now, Broward County voters will receive a bright yellow card when they go to cast their votes. The card reminds voters they have a choice on four separate ballot questions on the second page of the ballot, not three.

Walt Michot / Miami Herald

The Miami-Dade County Commission gave preliminary approval Tuesday to add transgender protections to the county’s human rights law.

Last year, Miami-Dade County considered outlawing discrimination against transgender individuals as it already does for other groups.

But the item failed to draw enough support and was withdrawn.

On Tuesday, the commission revisited the issue.  It passed unanimously.

A few members of the public spoke in support of the transgender community. No one spoke in opposition.

The City of North Miami

The Internal Revenue Service will be taking a closer look at the City of North Miami’s books this month.

In a letter sent to the city on Sept. 2, the IRS is specifically asking to review employee payroll records and information about eight city vendors from 2012.

Three days after the IRS announced its review, the North Miami finance manager who would have helped coordinate the Service's request resigned.

Camelia Siguineau in her brief resignation letter wrote, “Due to unforeseen family obligations, I am unable to continue my employment with the city.”

Emily Michot / Miami Herald

North Miami Acting  Mayor Philippe Bien-Aime believes the city may have disregarded its own hiring procedures for city employees.

He points to the recent arrest of the city’s former purchasing director MarcAnthony Tulloch as an example.

Tulloch previously worked for the city of Sunny Isles Beach. Apparently,  Sunny Isles Beach was investigating him for the misuse of a city credit card.

Miami-Dade Corrections and Rehabilitation Department

North Miami suspended its purchasing manager without pay on Friday, after the city's police chief confirmed he was recently arrested. 

Court records show MarcAnthony Tulloch was arrested by Sunny Isles Beach police on July 24 for third-degree grand theft and official misconduct.

According to North Miami City Manager Aleem Ghany, the felony charges stem from Tulloch's time as purchasing manager at  the City of Sunny Isles Beach.

A spokesperson for Sunny Isles Beach was not immediately available for comment.

Matt McGee / Flickr

The Miami Dolphins can earn millions in tourism tax dollars each year for luring high-profile sports and entertainment events to Sun Life Stadium, according to a deal approved by the Miami-Dade County Commission Tuesday.

As part of the deal, Dolphins owner Stephen Ross has agreed to spend $350 million to upgrade the Miami Gardens stadium.

The commission voted 7-4 in favor of the deal.

The Dolphins would get a share of the 3 percent tax charged for local hotel stays.

Doral Council Fires City Manager Joe Carrollo

Apr 28, 2014
Hector Gabino / El Nuevo Herald

As television cameras, heckling residents and bickering council members packed Doral City Hall on Monday, Joe Carollo sat quietly on the dais in the city manager’s seat.

On Friday, he had predicted he would lose his job.

Thirty minutes later, his prediction came true.

Council members voted 3-2 to fire the outspoken manager, during a meeting that erupted at times into shouting, name-calling, spontaneous boos and applause. Carollo had been on the job for 15 months.

Phillip Pessar/Flickr

In our If I Were Mayor interview with Miami Mayor Tomás Regalado, we asked him a few questions about the state of homelessness in the area.

Rick Stone

We Floridians might as well have been voting on different planets during the November, 2012, election. Some of us waited in line for eight or nine hours. Some were in and out of the polling place in eight minutes.

Turnout percentages ranged from the mid 50s to the mid 80s. Depending on where you lived, you had a greater or lesser chance of being forced to vote by provisional ballot, and a greater or lesser chance of that ballot eventually being discarded uncounted.

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