literature

Marcela Valdes is the books editor of The Washington Examiner and a specialist in Latin American literature and culture.

For more than 40 years, the most important book prize in South America has been bankrolled by the region's most famous petro-nation: Venezuela. Yet Venezuelan novelists themselves rank among the least read and translated writers in the entire continent. Over and over again as I worked on this article, I stumped editors and translators with a simple question: Who are Venezuela's best novelists?

http://www.humanesociety.org/

04/09/13 - Tuesday's Topical Currents begins with Paul Shapiro of the Humane Society of the United States.  The society urges a reduction or elimination of meat-based diets, for both health and ethical reasons.  Many school districts add more fruits and veggies in lunchroom fare, and offer “Meatless Mondays.”  Miami-Dade & Broward schools are participants.

Wikimedia Commons

South Florida may not exactly have the brainiest reputation -- but those of us in the area's intellectual trenches know that it's not all beach bimbos here. In fact, the pleasant weather and peaceful shoreline vistas may well be making the population collectively smarter.

Book Your Calendars For Booklegger's 'Library On The Run'

Jan 23, 2013
sushiesque / Flickr

Miami Beach is going literary, literally.

Thursday, local book enthusiasts can sit around, handcrafted cocktail in hand, and talk literature. Better yet, they can leave with a free book.

The event is put on by Bookleggers, a community mobile library often referred to as “a library on the run.”

Parallel Lives: Colm Tóibín on Henry James

Jan 13, 2013
Nick Doll

This post is featured thanks to our friends at the Key West Literary Seminar. Read more of their material here.

Nick Doll

This post is featured thanks to our friends at the Key West Literary Seminar. Read more of their material here.

Nico Tucci

The announcement that a Miami-raised son of Cuban immigrants has been chosen as the inaugural poet for President Obama's swearing-in ceremony is causing a stir throughout South Florida.  And nowhere more than in our region's literary community.

In 1993, a young civil engineer named Richard Blanco wanted to try his hand at writing poetry.  So he took a class at Florida International University, led by English Professor Campbell McGrath.

Mark Seliger

More than a quarter of a century after Tom Wolfe's novel The Bonfire of the Vanities looked at race relations, class divisions, greed and ambition in New York City, the influential writer has shifted his focus to the Magic City.

On his recent trip to Miami, Wolfe sat down to chat with WLRN-Miami Herald News features editor Alicia Zuckerman about his new novel, Back to Blood.

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