LGBT

A complicated picture has emerged of 29-year-old Omar Mateen, who opened fire in a gay Orlando nightclub. The attack left 49 dead and dozens more wounded in the worst mass shooting in modern U.S. history.

The moments after Sunday’s fatal nightclub shooting have felt long and heavy for Nuren Haider. The Orlando native says her hijab—a scarf and symbol of her faith—has become a marker.

Scenes of Grief and Healing in South Florida After Orlando Attack

Jun 13, 2016
Spencer Parts

In the hours and days following the Sunday massacre at a gay club in Orlando, members of South Florida's LGBT community have gathered to mourn and to provide comfort to each other.

In the wake of a mass shooting at a gay nightclub in Orlando that left at least 49 people dead and more than 50 wounded, queer Latino folks around the country are reflecting on the horror of the attack.

Sunday began with one of the deadliest shootings in American history — at least 49 people were killed and more than 50 were injured. The attack took place at Pulse, a gay nightclub in Orlando, and the suspect was an American Muslim who pledged allegiance to ISIS the night of the attack.

Miami Beach Police Department

As law enforcement agencies try to piece together  what happened Sunday morning at a gay nightclub in Orlando, when at least 50 people were gunned down, many in South Florida wonder about security and how to protect themselves and those they love from similar attacks. 

  "Every time there is a pride event, there is that fear that exists, especially since we have seen the passage of marriage equality," says Cindy Brown, Miami-Dade development officer for Equality Florida, the largest LGBTQ rights advocacy group in the state. 

 

On Sunday morning, a gunman at the gay nightclub Pulse in Orlando, Fla., perpetrated the deadliest mass shooting in modern American history. He killed 49 people and injured more than 50.

The city of Orlando has released the names of the identified victims, after notifying their next of kin.

Orlando Nightclub Shooting: How to Help

Jun 12, 2016
Lynare Robbins / Courtesy

A shooting at a gay nightclub in Orlando has left 50 dead and more injured, reported to be the largest mass shooting in U.S. history. Gov. Rick Scott declared a state of emergency Sunday morning.

There are a number of opportunities in South Florida to support the victims and their families.

Attend a vigil

Miami Beach Bans Conversion Therapy For Minors

Jun 9, 2016
Nick Swyter / the Miami Herald

Miami Beach is the latest city in the country to ban a controversial form of therapy that professes to change someone's sexual orientation or gender identity. The city commission voted unanimously Wednesday night to ban conversion therapy for minors under the age of 18.  And from now on, anyone caught practicing it might be slapped with a fine of two-hundred dollars a day. Miami Beach Commissioner John Elizabeth Alemàn sponsored the ban.

For the first time, Florida’s delegation to the Democratic National Convention will include an openly transgender individual.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Marco Ramirez graduates in about a month with a master’s degree in social work from Florida International University.

Ramirez, 25, is a transgender man and he says when looking for employment there are always unnecessary hurdles. 

Gender nonconforming and trans job seekers struggle to find inclusive workplaces.

And Ramirez adds,  when he does snag a job, there are always inappropriate questions about his gender identity. 

Where a mainstream fashion magazine might do a special "black issue," like Italian Vogue back in 2008, or a black lifestyle magazine might run a queer feature, the perspective of queer black folks tends to occupy occasional outskirts in fashion and lifestyle glossies, never the mainstay.

Tim Padgett / WLRN

Ana Marrero pulls back her shirt sleeve and holds out her left arm.

“Look, in Cuban prisons I tried on various occasions to kill myself with knives,” she says.

She counts the succession of healed scars on her forearm. They look like horizontal tally marks.

“Uno, dos, tres, quarto, cinco, seis, siete, ocho,” she counts in Spanish.

Eight times.

These days, it’s a lot easier to travel between the U.S. and Cuba, but some Cubans have no interest in going back to their homeland.

Ben Kushner

For a while in the late 1980s, Jeff Schmalz was the Miami bureau chief for the New York Times. That was before he was completely out of the closet, and Miami was one of the places in the country where he felt comfortable as a gay man.

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