Jeb Bush

In his race for the White House, Former Governor Bush has hit many bumps in the road, so he’s tossing some new tires on the campaign bus. Under the new anthem of “Jeb Can Fix It,” Bush is trying to shake off some of the criticisms that have left him down in the polls. South Florida Republican Carlos Curbelo says he has no regrets about supporting Bush so early.

“No not at all look I supported the candidate that I think is best prepared to be president of the United States and he’s now retooling his campaign. He’s going to relaunch it and looking forward to that,” Curbelo says.

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush will be feeling the heat again in Tuesday evening's debate as he tries to rebound from a disappointing performance last month that renewed questions about his viability.

"I think there's going to be a lot of pressure on Jeb," predicted Katie Packer Gage, who was Mitt Romney's deputy campaign manager in 2012. "He put some pressure on himself by telling people he's going to get better and work on his debate performance. I think this is kind of a make-or-break moment for him to really step up what he's been able to do in previous debates."

Republican Jeb Bush's campaign revival tour is getting louder and more colorful as he charges across early voting states with a can-do slogan, a tour bus and critiques of rivals who have become threats to his claim as the GOP mainstream favorite.

"We're Americans, dammit!" he shouted Wednesday at a pharmacy in Hollis, N.H., as he complained that the U.S. was not leading in key foreign policy disputes.

He saved special words for Donald Trump, the former reality show star who remains a leader in the unpredictable GOP nomination fight.

Michael Vadon

The News Service of Florida released a video in which executive editor Jim Saunders analyzes Jeb Bush’s presidential campaign.

Saunders talks with Steve Wilkerson from Capital Dateline Online about Bush's campaign reboot.

After seeming like a strong contender in the primaries, Saunders says the former Florida governor's campaign seems to be going unnoticed.

Anyone who has watched any of the presidential debates knows the claims have been flying around fast and furious. So we're going to take on some of those claims from the recent debate in Boulder, Colorado, from the Florida-based candidates in a bit of a lightning round with Josh Gillen of PolitiFact Florida.

This hasn't been the best of times for Jeb Bush - he's been getting pushback after last week's presidential debate to drop out of the race. But during a speech Monday at the Tampa Garden Club,  Bush said he's sticking to his long-term plan to win the White House.

Mark J. Terrill / AP

When Marco Rubio was asked at Wednesday's Republican presidential debate about the South Florida Sun Sentinel's editorial that called for his resignation as Senator, Rubio was prepared.

"I read that editorial with great amusement," Rubio said. The editorial board slammed Rubio for a poor voting record at Capitol Hill, which is among the lowest this year.

Hundreds of donors to Jeb Bush's presidential campaign will gather later this month in Houston. They'll shake hands with a pair of former presidents, and high-profile lieutenants of the former Florida governor will push them to write generous checks.

This weekend in Las Vegas, dozens of donors met up with Marco Rubio. They ate fast-food hamburgers, shook hands with a celebrity pawn-shop owner and played flag football with the Florida senator.

NADA / Flickr

Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush said he would scrap the national health insurance law known as Obamacare.

Bush outlined his plan to replace it during a speech in New Hampshire Tuesday.

Bush wants a system that protects people from worst-case scenarios rather than comprehensive coverage that includes services they may not want. He said insurance shouldn’t cover everything.

Jeb Bush's signature achievement in education policy as Florida governor may be at risk of coming apart.

A champion of what became known as Common Core education standards, Bush pushed a set of high-stakes tests for students and a system of grading schools as the centerpiece of an education agenda that defines much of his legacy in office.