immigration

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Evy Mage/Reuters

On February 26, 1993, a group of Islamic extremists parked a rental van with a 1,300-pound homemade bomb in its trunk underneath the World Trade Center in New York City. The subsequent explosion killed six people, injured more than 1,000 and was the largest terrorist attack on US soil at the time.

Nadege Green / WLRN

The dead bodies haunt Wislande Philippe.

“There were so many who died,” said Phillipe, 29. “Pregnant women. Children. You’re walking past them and there’s nothing you can do help them.”

Philippe is one of thousands of Haitians who have taken a perilous 11-country journey from Brazil to reach the United States.  

Last week, comedian Mohammad “Mo” Amer sat next to Eric Trump on a flight. He told him: "I’m not going to get a Muslim ID number. Bullshit. I’m not doing it."

Perhaps, for some Muslims in America, his response provided some relief. According to Amer, President-elect Donald Trump's third child said:

“That’s not gonna happen. Come on man, you can’t believe everything that you read.”

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

Immigration—or immigration enforcement—has been a signature issue for President-elect Donald Trump. One policy he has vowed to repeal is DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, which gives about 750,000 young immigrants the ability to work and go to college here in the U.S. 

President-elect Donald Trump pledged to immediately end President Barack Obama’s executive orders, which includes Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA. The controversial action, issued in 2012, established protections against deportation for immigrants who came to the country illegally as children.

Students from Miami Dade College’s Homestead campus and several area high schools staged a walkout Wednesday to protest the immigration proposals of President-elect Donald Trump. The students rallied outside Homestead City Hall to push for an ordinance to declare Homestead a “Sanctuary City"  and ask administrators to make each of their schools so-called sanctuary campuses.

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Jessica Rinaldi/Reuters

There is one very large muscle in my forehead that begins to twitch uncontrollably in the presence of injustice. It may have just aged my face five years in as many months, and it will be guaranteed a regular workout for the next four years.

If you can spare a few spasms of your own, I'd like to tell you about a particularly twitchy morning I recently spent, as I often do, in a Boston courtroom handling the cases of immigrant detainees.

Updated at 7:30 p.m. ET

He'll build a border wall and he'll deport millions of people who are in the U.S. illegally, President-elect Donald Trump says, promising to keep his campaign pledges on immigration in his first prolonged interview since winning the White House.

THE MIAMI HERALD

This week on The Florida Roundup...

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Jason Margolis

A decade ago, Marwan Sweedan was performing surgeries in Iraq. At the time, his family was working with coalition forces, and they became targets.

“My dad got captured, kidnapped, tortured and killed,” says Sweedan.

He says doctors were also being marked, so he applied for refugee status and was later relocated to San Jose, California.

“Being a refugee is not something you plan for, you don’t wake up in the morning and go, ‘I’m going to be a refugee today.’ No, it just happened,” says the 37-year-old Sweedan. 

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Jude Joffe-Block

Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio is one of the most controversial law enforcement officers in the United States. Now, his days may be numbered — thanks in part to an immigrant-led movement to oust him.

The strength of the movement was evident recently in a Phoenix parking lot, where about 500 volunteers gathered to knock on doors and persuade voters to oppose the Maricopa County sheriff. Organizers call this the biggest canvass to date against the sheriff, who has been in office nearly 24 years and is running in a tough re-election race.

Jin Park remembers where he was when Donald Trump announced his presidential bid in June, 2015. He was alone in his Harvard dorm room and watching Trump on TV.

"When Mexico sends its people, they're not sending their best," Trump told the crowd at New York's Trump Tower, "They're bringing drugs. They're bringing crime. They're rapists. And some, I assume, are good people."

Then he proposed a wall along the United States border with Mexico.

Associated Press

Hurricane Matthew's destruction in Haiti has put on hold a new policy of deporting Haitians who are in the United States without permission but the government intends to return to it in the future, U.S. Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson said Tuesday.

Speaking in Mexico City where he held talks with Cabinet officials on border, migration and security issues, Johnson noted that some flights to Haiti have been suspended in the wake of the storm, which has killed hundreds of people.

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Todd Bigelow/Contact Press Images

Latino men in wide brimmed cowboy hats, Muslim women donning colorful headscarves and Jamaican nationals in finely pressed suits filed their way into a makeshift federal courtroom at the Los Angeles Convention Center.

Clutching tiny American flags on the final day of their journey to citizenship, and with patriotic music blaring from speakers, more than 6,600 immigrants quickly find their seats.

These new citizens, sworn in on May 18, 2016, are the lucky ones.

Archive Photo / Associated Press

The U.S. Department of Homeland and Security has a warning to undocumented Haitians en route to its southwestern border with Mexico — turn around. Otherwise, you will be deported back to Haiti.

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