immigration

Thousands of Dreamers thought they had met the final deadline to renew their DACA status last month. But some of those applications got stuck in the mail.

The Trump administration plans to end the program formally known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, which protects nearly 700,000 young immigrants in the country illegally from deportation, starting next year.

The administration now says it will reconsider some applications that incorrectly were rejected, even though they were mailed before the deadline.

Zach Gibson / AP via Miami Herald

COMMENTARY

In 2012, conservative Florida Senator Marco Rubio made one of the strongest pitches for the DREAM Act I’ve ever heard.

The Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors Act, which has been sitting on Capitol Hill in one form or another since the turn of the century, would grant legal status to immigrants who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children. Rubio, a Cuban-American, said helping those so-called Dreamer immigrants was a “humanitarian mission.”

Yaneli Gonzalez / WLRN

If you pass by the Laundromat Art Space in Little Haiti, you’ll see the building covered in dozens of black and white portraits. These are the faces of those supporting Dreamers — people who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children and now have to fight to stay in the country.

The art installation is part of Inside Out, a project created in 2011 by award-winning artist, JR.

Joshua Geyer has worked with the artist for more than six years and is currently part of the Inside Out team.

While the Trump administration continues the federal government's already-massive deportation program, 11 cities and counties will be joining the list of jurisdictions providing legal defense for undocumented immigrants at risk of deportation.

The Trump administration this week began dismantling a longstanding humanitarian program known as temporary protected status, leaving hundreds of thousands of Central American immigrants living in heightened fear of deportation.

As politicians in Washington try and figure out what to do with the DACA program — Deferred Action For Childhood Arrivals — across the country, DACA recipients are working on their own plans ... trying to stay in the country if Congress doesn't act in time.

FIU Students March for 'Clean' Dream Act

Nov 9, 2017
Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

Several dozen Florida International University students walked out of classes and marched around campus Thursday calling for federal immigration reform.

Students called on Congress to pass a “clean” Dream Act, without attaching it to anti-immigration policies like a border wall. They also protested the Trump administration’s decision to end Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA).  That’s President Obama’s policy to suspend deportation for young people who came to the U.S. illegally as children.

Some 86,000 Hondurans remain in limbo after the acting secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, Elaine Duke, couldn't decided whether to extend or cancel their permission to stay in the U.S. But the department has given about 5,300 Nicaraguans notice that they have just over a year before they have to leave.

The two groups are covered under Temporary Protected Status which allows them to live and work in the U.S. after a storm ripped through their home countries while they were already here.


Valery Pozo still gets angry thinking about it. It was about a decade ago, and the immigrant communities in her hometown, Salt Lake City, were on edge because of recent immigration enforcement raids in the area. Pozo's mother, an immigrant from Peru, was on the sidelines at her son's soccer game when another parent asked whether she was "illegal."

"To me, that was clearly a racist question and a racist assumption," Pozo recalled.

But her mother saw it as a harmless comment, despite Pozo's best efforts to convince her that it was something bigger.

The surprising history of the green card lottery

Nov 2, 2017
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Shannon Stapleton/Reuters

Shortly after the vehicle attack in New York on Tuesday that killed eight people and injured about a dozen others, President Donald Trump took to Twitter to react:

Odalis Garcia / WLRN

State Rep. David Richardson of Miami Beach, who is running for Ileana Ros-Lehtinen's seat as U.S. representative for Florida's 27th Congressional District, held a Dreamer Dinner at David’s Cafe in Miami Beach to discuss immigration reform with Dreamers and their families.

“We need immigrants in this country. We depend on a growing base in our population. We depend on younger people to make our economy successful,” said Richardson said at the event on Sunday.

Cities and towns around the country rely on federal policing grants for a variety of expenses, including training, equipment, and personnel. So far there have been no payments.

The Byrne Justice Assistance Grant Program (JAG) provides hundreds of millions of dollars a year to states, tribes, and local governments. And they're usually disbursed by the end of the federal fiscal year on Sept. 30th.

Amid the Trump administration's efforts to arrest people living in the country illegally, the Department of Homeland Security is looking at locations for five new detention centers around the country that could hold thousands of detainees.

U.S. District Judge Susan Ritchie Bolton says that President Trump's pardon of former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio does not "revise the historical facts" of his case — and that she will not vacate her ruling that found Arpaio guilty of criminal contempt.

Two US judges order a freeze on Trump's third travel ban

Oct 18, 2017
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James Lawler/Reuters

US federal judges ordered a freeze on President Donald Trump's newest travel ban this week, saying it was essentially targeted at Muslims in violation of the US Constitution.

Maryland District Judge Theodore Chuang said Wednesday the ban on travelers from over half a dozen countries essentially had not changed from the first two versions, which were shot down in lower courts as discriminating against a single religion.

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