hurricane

Tom Krall lives on St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands on the west end of the island, high on a ridge. That's where he was in September when Hurricane Irma roared through.

"We had the full blast," Krall says. "Twenty of the 30 houses in my neighborhood lost their roofs or worse."

The National Hurricane Center says Irma had sustained winds of 185 mph when it hit the Virgin Islands with gusts of 200 mph or higher. They were the most powerful winds ever recorded in that part of the Caribbean.

Irma Insurance Losses Close To $10 Billion

Jun 14, 2018
Alex Harris

Insurance loss estimates from Hurricane Irma have hit $9.7 billion, up by more than $1 billion since April, according to the latest numbers posted by the Florida Office of Insurance Regulation.

Insurers also advised the state agency that the number of claims had reached 987,767 from the massive and deadly September storm. The was up more than 54,000 from when numbers were previously updated in April.

Officials said they expected claims to be made for more than a year after the storm, as property owners are able to get complete assessments of the damages.

hurricane supplies
C.M. GUERRERO / Miami Herald

It's the the last day of Florida’s week-long sales tax "holiday" on hurricane supplies. So, you may want to hurry up and by that generator, hand crank radio or gas tank--a bit cheaper than usual. 

Hurricane preparedness Sistrunk
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

Some people came because memories of last year’s Hurricane Irma made them laugh. Some people came because memories of Hurricane Irma made them cringe. But the more than 200 people that came to Broward County's open house for hurricane preparedness in Fort Lauderdale's Sistrunk neighborhood on Saturday were all trying to make summer storm plans. 

 

“Got some hand sanitizer, flashlights, first-aid kit…” Brian Bush said, as he dumped out his ‘Get A Plan!’ bag full of hurricane supplies. 

NASA JOHNSON / FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced Thursday it will begin releasing water Friday from Lake Okeechobee because of concerns over rising water levels.

While it's not unusual to discharge water during periods of heavy rain, it is unusual to start this early in the summer. 

"Historic rain across the region since the middle of May has caused the lake to rise more than a foot," said Col. Jason Kirk, Jacksonville District commander, in a press release. "We have to be prepared for additional water that could result from a tropical system."

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

The lull lasted more than a decade. A major storm hadn’t made landfall in South Florida since the 2004-2005 double-hitter of Hurricanes Wilma and Katrina.

That record ended this past September when Hurricane Irma rocked the region and much of the Caribbean.

The Category 5 storm first made landfall in Barbuda with maximum winds of nearly 180 mph. The hurricane then ripped through St. Martin, the British and U.S. Virgin Islands, Turks and Caicos, the Bahamas and Cuba.

Kate Stein / WLRN

"Seventy-two hours. Three days."

That's how long officials expect residents to be able to survive on their own after a hurricane strikes, which includes having on hand three days' worth of food, medicines and other necessities, according to Mark Moore, deputy emergency manager for the City of Miami.

Nancy Klingener covers the Florida Keys for WLRN. George Neugent is the Monroe city commissioner. Stephanie Kaple is the director of the Florida Keys Outreach Coalition. Hurricane Season starts June 1 and Sundial talked to Kilngener, Neugent and Kaple about Monroe County post Irma, recovery efforts and preparedness for the upcoming season.

Jonathan Schilling / Creative Commons

In the aftermath of Hurricanes Irma and Maria, the federal government signed a multimillion-dollar deal with Carnival Corporation to help house federal aid workers and first responders on the company's Fascination cruise ship in the United States Virgin Islands.

Up to four major hurricanes could form in the Atlantic this hurricane season, according to the annual forecast from NOAA's Climate Prediction Center.

The Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 to Nov. 30. Overall, the season will likely be normal or somewhat more intense than normal, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says, with a 25 percent chance that hurricane activity will be below normal.

AP

Researchers including the Union of Concerned Scientists have argued that climate change is exacerbating the strength of hurricanes

Yet not a single session at the 32nd Annual Governor’s Hurricane Conference, held this week in West Palm Beach, focused on climate change research as it relates to hurricanes. 

As the start of hurricane season nears, National Hurricane Center director Ken Graham wants South Florida residents to make a plan now. On Sundial, the former journalist discusses the science of forecasting, how he communicates impacts and the importance of working across industries when it comes to hurricane preparedness.

He recently spoke at the 32nd Annual Governor's Hurricane Conference in West Palm Beach. The conference is held before the start of each hurricane season and offers sessions on hurricane preparedness and communication. 

Hurricane season begins June 1 and director of the National Hurricane Center Ken Graham, who recently spoke at the 32nd Annual Governor’s Hurricane Conference, joins Sundial.

The conference is held before the start of each hurricane season and offers sessions on hurricane preparedness and communication. Sundial spoke to Graham about the conference and the need for awareness around how climate change intensifies storms.

Peter Haden / WLRN

With hurricane season fast approaching, Florida Power and Light is testing its systems — and more than 3,000 employees — to make sure they can get the lights back on quickly after a storm.

All this week at the Riviera Beach command center, the company is drilling for a hypothetical storm with characteristics similar to Hurricane Wilma, which struck Florida in 2005.

The company said it’s applying lessons learned from Hurricane Irma.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Several South Florida nonprofits are launching five meetings to ensure equality in hurricane recovery efforts, continuing work that began after Hurricane Irma.

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