higher education

John O'Connor / WLRN

Gov. Rick Scott's budget veto list broke records Tuesday, and education projects weren't spared despite Scott's emphasis on K-12 funding this year.

In total, Scott vetoed $461.4 million from the now $78.7 billion spending plan. Scott signed the plan in private Tuesday and the budget takes effect July 1.

John O'Connor / StateImpact Florida

Ashley Jean is graduating from Miami’s iPrep Academy this week. And then she’s planning to travel the world.

Jean will start a global studies program through Long Island University that will eventually take her to places like Costa Rica, Australia, Bali and Spain.

That’s a lot of plane tickets.

“I don’t want money to be a reason why I can’t change my life,” Jean says, “so I have to work hard to do what I can to get this program.”

Take Stock In Children

A former dean at Miami Dade College has been chosen to lead the Florida College System.

Florida Education Commissioner Pam Stewart has chosen Madeline Pumariega to be chancellor of the state's system of community colleges.

Pumariega worked for more than a decade at Miami Dade College, including serving as dean of students at the Wolfson Campus. She has been the president and CEO of Take Stock in Children since 2013.
 

The statewide non-profit takes students at risk of dropping out of high school and helps them complete college.

Steven Martin / Flickr/Creative Commons

A twist to the end of the state legislative session means lawmakers need to reconvene again. 

Legislative Session

Cornell University

Three months ago, W. Kent Fuchs became president of the University of Florida, leaving New York’s Cornell University.

Fuchs says Florida universities are adding new faculty, but opposition to higher tuition means more pressure to find private donations.

The University of Florida is also expanding a new online program with a goal of eventually enrolling 24,000 students.

Fuchs sat down with WLRN’s StateImpact Florida reporter John O’Connor to talk about the issues in higher education.

M.S. Butler / StateImpact Florida

A college education is generally considered a student's best shot at getting a good job these days, and it's often assumed most high schoolers are prepared to attend college.

But there's one group that has been quietly excluded from that process -- students with intellectual disabilities.

A program at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg  is giving these students college experience that, while it's not a traditional degree, is giving them a head start on their career goals.

mcd.edu

Performance funding in public higher education is a way for states to hold institutions accountable for certain outcomes. But new research shows it doesn’t do much to keep students enrolled or boost graduation rates.

Rick Stone

President Obama's America's College Promise would provide free community college tuition for two years to students who keep their grades up, stay in school and show progress toward graduation.

As he introduced it this month, the president presented it as a logical extension of the nation's free public school system, updated for the education requirements of the modern economy.

Maria Murriel / WLRN

The Chaplin School of Hospitality at Florida International University doesn't offer a degree in beer brewing. There isn't even a degree in beverage management (although there's a minor).

But earlier this year, FIU became the only school in South Florida with a brewing lab.

Saint Leo Takes on Transitioning Veterans

Nov 12, 2014

It’s difficult to define today’s military veteran. But there is one thing they have in common - they don’t like being painted with the same broad brush.

“Just because I’m a veteran, particularly me because I’m a Marine, a combat Marine, don’t think you know my political affiliation, my beliefs, my values,” said Tedd “Gunny” Weiser, short for Gunnery Sergeant. “There is a label and we want to shed that, we want people to know that we are our own person.”

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