Haitian TPS

ODALIS GARCIA / WLRN News

Guests for Sundial Tuesday, March 13 2018:

Scott Zucker , vice president of Audubon Everglades, called in from a Palm Beach County Commission meeting to discuss efforts to preserve the 37 areas of natural land in the county. He spoke about how he is asking lawmakers to set aside the necessary funding to maintain the areas and prevent them from being developed. 

Haitian And Salvadoran TPS Holders Sue Trump Administration

Feb 22, 2018
Al Diaz / Miami Herald

Eight Haitian and Salvadoran immigrants living in the United States with temporary protection from deportation have filed a lawsuit against the Trump administration, arguing that its decision to end Temporary Protected Status was based on racism and discrimination that violates their constitutional rights.

The NAACP is suing the Department of Homeland Security over the Trump administration's decision to terminate the temporary protected status, or TPS, of tens of thousands of Haitians living in the U.S.

At least 46,000 Haitians are living in the U.S. with protection from deportation and the ability to work under the TPS program, which is meant to help immigrants from countries affected by natural disasters or wars.

AL DIAZ - MIAMI HERALD

President Donald Trump met with leading lawmakers last week to talk about immigration. According to the Washington Post and other media outlets, Trump asked, "Why do we want all these people from 'shithole countries' coming here?" referring to Haiti, El Salvador and some African nations. 

Bryan Cereijo for The Miami Herald

The U.S. has ended a temporary residency program for almost 60,000 Haitians who had been allowed to legally enter the United States after an earthquake in 2010. The program, called temporary protected status, allows people from nations hit by conflict or natural disaster to remain legally but temporarily in the U.S. for up to 18 months. TPS has often been extended, allowing some people to remain in the U.S. legally for several years.

Today on Sundial: Haitians living in the U.S.  have until July 2019 to return to Haiti or leave the country. The decisions come after the Department of Homeland Security ended  Temporary Protected Status for Haitians Immigrants earlier this month. Marleine Bastien, executive director of Haitian Women of Miami (FANM), an advocacy group dedicated to serving the needs of low-income women and their families, joins us to understand more about the Haitian TPS termination.

Sandy Dorsainvil

The women behind a Thanksgiving brunch in Little Haiti are hoping turkey will distract from the community's renewed concerns about immigration.

Yaneli Gonzalez / WLRN

South Florida's top Roman Catholic leader called on Congress to create a path to citizenship for Haitians who moved to the U.S. after the devastating 2010 earthquake.

Peter Haden / WLRN

Hundreds of Florida hospitality workers marched to Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach Tuesday, just hours after the Department of Homeland Security announced the end of temporary protected status for some 50,000 Haitians.

WLRN

Temporary Protected Status for tens of thousands of Haitians living in the U.S. will end in 2019. The announcement came Monday, leaving thousands of people scattering to figure out the next step. We spoke with Patricia Mazzei of the Miami Herald about the latest news on TPS recipients.

Associated Press

Almost eight years after an earthquake destroyed their country – and prompted the U.S. to let them stay in this country protected from deportation – more than 50,000 Haitians were told on Monday they will soon lose that benefit.

Wilson Sayre

The effort to put emergency money for food into the pockets and bank accounts of South Florida meant waiting in  lines and in court this week.

D-SNAP is the government program for disaster food assistance. The federal government program returned to the region for three days this week after overwhelming demand last month led to long lines and police shutting down some distribution sites over public safety concerns. 

Bryan Cereijo / Miami Herald

WASHINGTON - A bipartisan group of South Florida lawmakers introduced a bill on Tuesday that provides a path to permanent residency for thousands of foreign citizens who participate in a temporary program that allows them to work and live in the United States.

Miami Republican Rep. Carlos Curbelo introduced the Extending Status Protection for Eligible Refugees with Established Residency Act, which provides a pathway to permanent legal status for certain Haitians, Nicaraguans, Salvadorans and Hondurans who arrived in the United States before Jan. 13, 2011.

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