Rebecca Blackwell / AP via Miami Herald


You don’t need to be a detective to know that the Dominican Republic has already begun deporting Haitian-Dominicans.

International media report this week that tent cities are sprouting up at towns like Anse-à-Pitres on Haiti’s side of its border with the D.R. This morning I spoke by phone with Mia Pean, a Haitian-American relief worker who lives near Anse-à-Pitres. Her organization just received a group of Haitian-Dominican youths who say they were deported from the D.R. a few days ago – even though they claim they were born there.

Tim Padgett / WLRN.org

Is the Dominican Republic’s controversial plan to deport hundreds of thousands of people of Haitian descent on hold? 

Almost half a million people living in the Dominican Republic have Haitian ancestry. But the Dominican Supreme Court has ruled that anyone born in the D.R. after 1929 will have their citizenship revoked if their parents were not Dominican. That has set the stage this summer for the deportation of hundreds of thousands of Haitian-Dominicans.

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

Nadege Green

On Wednesday the Miami Workers Center, a Miami-based social justice group, hosted a standing-room-only community forum about the potential mass deportation of Haitians and Dominicans of Haitian descent from the Dominican Republic.

Maria Murriel / WLRN

"What happens if a writer of color wants to write about white supremacy?" asks Junot Diaz, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author who last year penned a New Yorker essay about the "unbearable too-whiteness" of Master of Fine Arts (MFA) programs. 

Diaz is co-founder of the Voices of Our Nation Arts Foundation (VONA) and the VONA/Voices workshop, which for 15 years has provided a "safe space" in the San Francisco Bay Area for writers of color.

Dieu Nalio Chery / AP

Haitians living in the Dominican Republic face an urgent deadline Wednesday night if they want to stay in that country. But the Dominican Republic faces renewed international criticism if it carries out mass deportations of Haitians.

The Dominican Republic shares the Caribbean island of Hispaniola with Haiti. And Haiti is the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere. So hundreds of thousands of Haitians have emigrated to – and were born in – the more economically stable Dominican Republic.

Rick Stone

One of the latest villains in the rogues' gallery of human rights is the Dominican Republic because of a decision handed down by the country's highest constitutional court late last year.

Reaching back decades into its shared but troubled history with Haiti, the nation with which it shares the island of Hispaniola, it ruled that ethnic Haitians living in the D.R., some of them since 1929, are not eligible for citizenship because of the "in transit" status of their parents.

Jean Marc Herve Abelard / rapadoo.com

The Dominican Republic is right about one thing. The nations of the world are indeed moving away from birthright citizenship. In fact, only 30 of the world’s 194 countries today automatically grant citizenship to anyone born on their soil – and no European nations do.