gun violence

For the more than 3,000 students at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, Wednesday's mass shooting was terrifying and life-changing. But what of the tens of millions of other children, in schools across the country, who have since heard about what happened and now struggle with their own feelings of fear, confusion and uncertainty?

Peter Haden / WLRN

The FBI ignored a tip last month that the accused Majory Stoneman Douglas High School killer was dangerous and at risk of committing a school shooting.

Seventeen people died in the attack.

South Broward High School Students Fear They Could Be Next

Feb 16, 2018
Adrianne Gonzalez / WLRN News

Students at South Broward High School in Hollywood organized a gun control protest outside school grounds Friday, two days after a gunman opened fire at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, killing 17 people.

From the morning bell at 8 a.m. till past the last bell of the day, students and a few faculty members held posters and chanted, “It could have been us” and “It can still be us.”

South Broward is about half an hour away from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, where a 19-year-old opened fire on Wednesday, killing 17.

Leslie Ovalle

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is ordering a review of the Justice Department's processes after the FBI failed to investigate a tip that the Florida school shooting suspect could be plotting an attack.

Leslie Ovalle / WLRN News

Caitlin Switalski

Broward County school board members  say schools and churches need to pay more attention to the mental health needs of children. 

School Board Members Robin Bartleman and Rosalind Osgood held each other and cried underneath the Sawgrass Expressway after  a press conference Thursday in which the Broward Sheriff's Office gave updates on the massacre that killed 17 and injured 14 at Marjorie Stoneman Douglas High School.

Bartleman said the demands on guidance counselors and social workers in schools is “astronomical.”

Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

Broward Health Medical Center received seven patients after Wednesday’s shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland. They were all kids.

This week, when a district court in Las Vegas unsealed nearly 300 pages of police affidavits, the name of a second person of interest in the mass shooting that left 58 people dead was blacked out.

But because of an error, the documents released to The Las Vegas Review-Journal included name of an Arizona man named Douglas Haig, according to the newspaper. And it started another frenzy over whether Stephen Paddock acted alone.

Marsha Halper / WLRN

Sammie Willis was a talker. He held court from his wheelchair—the man was a fixture at the gate to his small, cinder block apartment complex in Overtown—and talked to his neighbors, to the parents walking their kids to school, to the young men who cycled through this block. He greeted them all with a booming voice that resonated down the street. He talked to them about their families. About God. About love. About the hard things in life.

 

Yaneli Gonzalez / WLRN

For the past 20 years, Miami-Dade County officials have held annual press conferences before New Year’s Eve and the Fourth of July to remind citizens that “One Bullet Kills the Party.”

Instagram

A Miami anti-violence activist crumpled onto the floor in a Tallahassee courtroom screaming after the man who shot and killed her son was found not guilty.

Tangela Sears’ son David Queen was killed during an argument at the Tallahassee apartment complex where he lived in 2015.

Police are scouring Tampa's Seminole Heights neighborhood, one day after a man was gunned down on Nebraska Avenue. It was the fourth murder in a month in the area north of downtown Tampa.

Provided / The John Lennon Educational Tour Bus

When the John Lennon Educational Tour Bus pulled up at Hialeah Gardens High School, many students didn’t know much about the famous late Beatle.

Some wondered if he was on the bus himself. One insisted to her friend his last name was “Legend.”

But when the educators who drive the bus-turned-recording-studio-on-wheels played the 1971 song “Imagine” and other Beatles tunes, the kids understood the messages. They know what it’s like to yearn for a world without violence.

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