gun violence

Nadege Green / WLRN

They call themselves “Mothers Fighting For Justice.” But it’s not just moms—siblings, girlfriends and close friends are also here.

LOCUST PROJECTS

When medical marijuana passed in Florida as a constitutional amendment in 2016, it had a 72 percent approval rate. But because of a number of legal challenges, medical marijuana patients still can’t actually smoke their pot in Florida. Dara Kam, a senior writer for the News Service of Florida, joined Sundial to discuss the current state of medical marijuana laws in Florida. It's an issue she thinks is going to make its way to the Supreme Court.

Sam Turken / WLRN

U.S. Senator Bill Nelson of Florida toured the Liberty Square public housing complex with local politicians Friday before meeting with more than a dozen Liberty City activists—some of whom have lost relatives to shootings.

The discussion focused on ways to reduce gun violence and improve housing and other opportunities in the area that has long been a hotbed for violence and poverty. 

Two Miami artists are creating a visual archive of the toll gun violence takes by drawing portraits of people whose lives ended abruptly by bullets.

Chire Regans and Markeven Williams embarked on their individual projects around the same time, but they didn't know each other. Regan, a teaching artist at the Perez Art Museum, and Williams, a corrections officer, both say they were moved by the killing of six-year old King Carter in 2016. King was going to buy candy outside of his North Miami-Dade home when he was shot. 

Lily Oppenheimer / WLRN

The faces of 90 victims of gun violence in South Florida, done in black-and-white sketches by PAMM Teaching Artist Chire Regans, presided on Thursday night over a parent forum and resource fair to address youth violence and prevention. They were a stark reminder of the lives at stake if violence and youth outreach isn’t addressed more around Miami-Dade  County. 


Sam Turken / WLRN

Gun violence activists gathered in Miami this weekend as part of a national campaign to honor victims of shootings. 

  

Sunday morning, people in Santa Fe, Texas, flocked to local churches, seeking comfort after this week's high school shooting that killed 10 people and injured 13 others.

The residents of this deeply-religious community are just starting to process their emotions, as they also look for answers as to how such a thing could happen.

"Lord I need you, oh I need you," sang the choir at Arcadia First Baptist Church. It was the refrain of many who are turning to faith to deal with the grim reality that this familiar, and tragic, American routine has now come to their town.

If this were a normal Monday morning, students at Santa Fe High School in Santa Fe, Texas, would be heading back to class. Instead, school is closed, its classrooms still a crime scene. The big question for investigators: How did a gunman walk into school Friday morning, killing 10 people and wounding 13?

But Katelyn "Kayte" Alford and her 1,400 classmates struggle with a different question: How do we move on from this?

Updated at 10:45 p.m. ET

At least 10 people were killed when a gunman opened fire inside a small-town Texas high school, in what Gov. Greg Abbott called "probably the worst disaster ever to strike this community."

Ten others were wounded in the morning attack at Santa Fe High School.

Miami Herald

Sirena Harrell was in her second semester at Miami Dade College when she lost her son to a hail of bullets.

Fifteen-year-old Isaiah "Zay" Solomon had been attending the wake for his teenage cousin, also a victim of gun violence, in West Little River when he got caught in the crossfire of a drive-by shooting. His killer has never been found, and his mom has never been the same.

Miami-Dade Bar Association

The Dade County Bar Association's Young Lawyers Section held an essay contest for students to discuss their experiences with gun violence and to offer up possible solutions.

Students from across Miami-Dade wrote about hearing gun shots outside of their homes, the lack of resources for neighborhoods plagued by gun violence and the need for more counselors to address youth trauma.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Immediately after the Marjory Stoneman Douglas shooting, counselors and therapists were available in local parks.  But since that public showing of mental health support, students and their families continue to struggle with the trauma of what happened.

Governor Rick Scott has awarded the Medal of Heroism to the school resource officer credited with taking quick action to help prevent another mass school shooting last week.

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