The Florida Roundup

Disney may be the next company facing public pressure over its political contributions in Florida.

Opioid Lawsuit

The state of Florida is going after major opioid manufacturers and distributors.

Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi on Tuesday at a recovery center in Tampa announced the state is seeking to recover all damages allowable. She predicted a likely settlement in the billions.

Bondi said 15 people die every day in Florida from opioid abuse. More than 10,000 Floridians have died from what Bondi calls the state’s “opioid crisis.”

Medical Marijuana

Hector Gabino / El Nuevo Herald

Charlie Hand has been living in Miami's Spring Garden neighborhood for almost two decades. He has dealt with the area’s changes firsthand.

“In this restaurant district, there’s music coming from restaurants and yachts out back and fireworks,” he says. “And that has diminished our quality of life, to be woken up in the night and early morning.”

South Florida Faces A Costly Sewage Problem

Jan 28, 2018
Las Olas Fort Lauderdale
Wally Gobetz via Flickr / WLRN

From Delray Beach to Virginia Key, South Florida is spending millions of dollars to fix old sewer systems. 

 

Does Miami Have A Chance To Host Amazon HQ2?

Jan 21, 2018
AP

Miami is still in the race. This week Amazon announced the 20 cities on its short list as it decides where to build its second headquarters (HQ2) – a $5-billion investment promising 50,000 high-paying jobs.

Though the final list singles out Miami, the proposal was a regional effort. 

A state judge says it’s unconstitutional to make Florida women wait to get an abortion while another sex scandal opens the state legislative session. Plus, the political world in Florida and nationwide is on fire over allegations President Donald Trump used an expletive term.


WLRN News / Miami Herald

If you thought the first year of President Trump’s Administration was an unprecedented year in politics, just wait. 

2018 brings with it the midterm election, including the races for Florida governor, the U.S. Senate and House and the expiration of two federal immigration programs — Temporary Protected Status and Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.

Plus, a passenger train service is supposed to get rolling between Miami, Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach. 

Miami Herald

About 4,700 people died in Puerto Rico in September and October of 2016. A year later, 5,800 people died over that same two-month stretch. Could the difference of 1,100 deaths been caused by Hurricane Maria?

According to the island’s official count, the storm killed 62 people. The Center for Investigative Journalism looked at government data on deaths, trying to get a handle on Maria’s death toll on the island.

A Florida senator quits after news of more bad behavior and big changes could be coming to the shipping industry after the disaster surrounding El Faro. Plus, we have a look at the far-ranging influence of Florida icon Jimmy Buffett.


REUTERS

Two of Florida’s largest counties, Palm Beach and Broward, have started a process that could take opioid drug makers to court for their roles in the opioid crisis. 

Miami Herald

Sexual harassment, abuse and inappropriate behavior are not new, and South Florida itself is not immune. "Abuse isn't an economic issue; it's across the board. In Hispanic culture it is a double whammy: It's a culture of machismo and a culture of silence. It's a deadly combination," says Miami Herald columnist Fabiola Santiago.

M. SPENCER GREEN / AP

There are nearly two million gun licenses in Florida but figuring out exactly how many guns are in the state is a more challenging figure to extract. Florida, like most states, does not require gun owners to register their weapons. 

AP Photo/Steve Cannon

The first reports of Sen. Jeff Clemens' extramarital affair with a lobbyist came four days before Halloween. The Lake Worth politician was the top Democrat in the state Senate and set to lead the minority party in 2019. He resigned that same day.

Facebook via Miami Herald

It was a Nixonesque moment — a politician asked about questionable campaign tactics — when Michael Grieco told the Miami Herald to “look right into my soul.”

 

Greico, a first-time commissioner elected in 2013, handed in his resignation at City Hall on Oct. 24. He faced a charge of accepting an illegal campaign contribution, but he avoided admitting guilt and said he didn’t do it.

 

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