Florida Constitution Revision Commission

Broward County Charter Review Commission
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

The ballot in November's election will be historic for a few reasons, mainly because it’s going to be historically long.  

Florida’s Constitution Revision Commission meets once every 20 years. Broward County’s Charter Review Commission, or CRC, meets every 12. Both put out a series of resolutions for voters to decide on.

This year, the two commissions overlap.  That means Broward County residents will see at least 24 questions on the November ballot. 

 

Florida voters will pick a slate of new state leaders, local legislative representatives, city and county officials  and toward the end, if they make it-- a dozen or so requests to change the state constitution.  Yet some of those requests are likely to give voters pause upon a close read: do they want to ban indoor vaping while simultaneously banning offshore drilling?  Many of the amendments are grouped together and observers worry the result will end up confusing voters. 

Florida voters this November will decide on a proposed constitutional amendment that spells out the rights of crime victims.

Florida voters will have a chance to ban vaping in restaurants and other businesses, prohibit oil drilling in state waters, create a list of crime victims' rights and give free state university tuition to the spouses and children of first responders who die on the job.

First Responder, State College Issues Go On Ballot

Apr 17, 2018

Florida voters will decide whether the state Constitution should mandate death benefits be paid when law enforcement officers, correctional officers, firefighters and other first responders are killed while performing their official duties.

In a 30-7 vote on Monday, the Florida Constitution Revision Commission backed the proposal (Proposal 6002), which will appear as Amendment 7 on the Nov. 6 general-election ballot.

CAROLE FEUERMAN STUDIOS

Guests for Sundial Thursday, April 12 2018:

 

The Florida Constitution Revision Commission meets every 20 years to review proposals to the state's constitution. The commission has narrowed down thousands of proposed amendments to 12. 

 

Commission member Tim Cerio is an attorney and Gov. Rick Scott's former general counsel. He 

joined the program from our sister station WFSU in Tallahassee to talk about the revision process and shed light on what voters can expect to see on the November ballot.

 

 

Author Kwame Alexander

Gov. Rick Scott’s long-standing priority to eliminate Florida’s certificate of need program for Florida hospitals came to a halt Monday, after a member of a powerful panel withdrew a proposal that would have overhauled the current hospital-approval system.

Getty images via Miami Herald

Floridians will not vote on adding gun control measures to the state constitution this year because a state board, citing technical rules, rejected the proposals Wednesday.

The 37-member Constitutional Review Commission is an obscure yet powerful body that meets every 20 years to propose changes to the Florida constitution, which are then put on the November ballot. During a marathon meeting in the Capitol, several commissioners from both parties tried to add three different gun-related amendments to a proposal related to land ownership.

A Constitution Revision Commission proposal to extend the retirement age of Florida’s Supreme Court justices from 70 to 75 is moving forward, and may soon be in front of voters. Commissioner Darryl Rouson says he trusts the move won’t negatively affect diversity in the position.

Florida’s full 37-member Constitution Revision Commission is meeting this week to consider proposed amendments that could be placed on the 2018 ballot. One proposal addresses a conflict in Florida’s Constitution dealing with elections.

Backed by Gov. Rick Scott and other Republican leaders, a proposed constitutional amendment that would make it harder for the Legislature to raise taxes and fees appears to have broad voter support, a new poll shows.

The final public hearing of Florida’s Constitution Revision Commission on Tuesday included a new push to let voters decide if Florida should ban assault-style weapons.

CRC Weighs Felon Voting Rights Proposal

Mar 9, 2018

A proposal that could’ve changed the way felons’ rights are restored was withdrawn the Constitution Revision Commission Thursday, leaving a broken system intact for now. But it’s not the final say on the issue.

Associated Press

Guests for Sundial, Monday, February 5, 2018

Brendan Byrne, space reporter at WMFE in Orlando. The host of the podcast "Are We There Yet?"

Tim Cerio is a current commissioner on the Florida Constitution Revision Commission. The commission is in Fort Lauderdale on Tuesday for a public hearing.

More than 300 people wanted to have their moment at the microphone during the first public hearing of the amendments up for debate on the state's Constitution Revision Committee (CRC). 

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