Florida Constitution

Florida voters will pick a slate of new state leaders, local legislative representatives, city and county officials  and toward the end, if they make it-- a dozen or so requests to change the state constitution.  Yet some of those requests are likely to give voters pause upon a close read: do they want to ban indoor vaping while simultaneously banning offshore drilling?  Many of the amendments are grouped together and observers worry the result will end up confusing voters. 

Florida voters this November will decide on a proposed constitutional amendment that spells out the rights of crime victims.

Florida voters will have a chance to ban vaping in restaurants and other businesses, prohibit oil drilling in state waters, create a list of crime victims' rights and give free state university tuition to the spouses and children of first responders who die on the job.

First Responder, State College Issues Go On Ballot

Apr 17, 2018

Florida voters will decide whether the state Constitution should mandate death benefits be paid when law enforcement officers, correctional officers, firefighters and other first responders are killed while performing their official duties.

In a 30-7 vote on Monday, the Florida Constitution Revision Commission backed the proposal (Proposal 6002), which will appear as Amendment 7 on the Nov. 6 general-election ballot.

Gov. Rick Scott’s long-standing priority to eliminate Florida’s certificate of need program for Florida hospitals came to a halt Monday, after a member of a powerful panel withdrew a proposal that would have overhauled the current hospital-approval system.

Getty images via Miami Herald

Floridians will not vote on adding gun control measures to the state constitution this year because a state board, citing technical rules, rejected the proposals Wednesday.

The 37-member Constitutional Review Commission is an obscure yet powerful body that meets every 20 years to propose changes to the Florida constitution, which are then put on the November ballot. During a marathon meeting in the Capitol, several commissioners from both parties tried to add three different gun-related amendments to a proposal related to land ownership.

A Constitution Revision Commission proposal to extend the retirement age of Florida’s Supreme Court justices from 70 to 75 is moving forward, and may soon be in front of voters. Commissioner Darryl Rouson says he trusts the move won’t negatively affect diversity in the position.

Miami Herald

After drawing widespread opposition from business and agriculture groups, a proposal to redefine legal standing for Floridians on environmental issues won’t go before voters in November.

The Judicial Committee of the Florida Constitution Revision Commission on Friday unanimously rejected the proposal (P 23), filed by commission member Jacqui Thurlow-Lippisch, with opponents saying it was too broad.

The Florida Constitution will be revised come the new year. The Constitution Revision Commission is in charge of the revision, which takes place every 20 years. 

The Florida Constitution Revision Commission will consider a proposal that would make it easier for schools to comply with class-size limits, with any financial savings required to go toward higher teacher pay.

From banning the death penalty to creating an elected secretary of state, members of the Florida Constitution Revision Commission have filed more than five dozen proposals to change the state Constitution.

Miami Herald

In a swift, 20-minute meeting, the panel charged with updating the Florida Constitution on Tuesday rejected all but a few of the 2,012 public proposals submitted to the Constitution Revision Commission, advancing only six of them, after months of encouraging the public to submit ideas.

After a sometimes chaotic and heated debate, the Constitution Revision Commission on Tuesday adopted compromise ground rules that open government advocates say they can live with.

The Constitution Revision Commission

On Wednesday, the Constitution Revision Commission met to work on  passing its first measure: rules to govern how it will operate over the next year.

While the CRC has been touring the state on what it calls a listening session, it hasn’t  conducted any other official business since the first gathering of its 37 members in March. And the group gathered Wednesday in Tampa didn’t quite get to check off anything new.

Progressive groups are keeping a close eye on the Constitution Revision Commission, and this week, they’re more worried than ever. It's the prestigious panel that meets every 20 years to put measures directly on the ballot.

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