Florida Constitution

The Florida Constitution Revision Commission will consider a proposal that would make it easier for schools to comply with class-size limits, with any financial savings required to go toward higher teacher pay.

From banning the death penalty to creating an elected secretary of state, members of the Florida Constitution Revision Commission have filed more than five dozen proposals to change the state Constitution.

Miami Herald

In a swift, 20-minute meeting, the panel charged with updating the Florida Constitution on Tuesday rejected all but a few of the 2,012 public proposals submitted to the Constitution Revision Commission, advancing only six of them, after months of encouraging the public to submit ideas.

After a sometimes chaotic and heated debate, the Constitution Revision Commission on Tuesday adopted compromise ground rules that open government advocates say they can live with.

The Constitution Revision Commission

On Wednesday, the Constitution Revision Commission met to work on  passing its first measure: rules to govern how it will operate over the next year.

While the CRC has been touring the state on what it calls a listening session, it hasn’t  conducted any other official business since the first gathering of its 37 members in March. And the group gathered Wednesday in Tampa didn’t quite get to check off anything new.

Progressive groups are keeping a close eye on the Constitution Revision Commission, and this week, they’re more worried than ever. It's the prestigious panel that meets every 20 years to put measures directly on the ballot.

Pedro Portal / Miami Herald

Floridians can now change the Florida Constitution from their couches, at least for the next few months.

The Constitution Revision Commission has started accepting suggestions for amendments to the state’s governing document online.

The 37-person Constitution Revision Commission (CRC) meets once every 20 years and is tasked with figuring out what changes or additions need to be made to Florida's governing document in order to bring the state through the next 20 years.

Miami Herald

Once every 20 years a group of people gets together to change the Florida Constitution, the most fundamental law of the state. That’s happening right now and anyone can be a part of those discussions as the group holds two meeting in South Florida.

Miami Herald

Every 20 years, a 37-person commission comes up with a list of amendments to the Florida Constitution.

The next cohort of the Constitutional Revision Commission (CRC) met on Monday for the first time,  in the Florida Senate chambers in Tallahassee.

The group will have a year to travel around the state and figure out what kinds of changes need to be made to the constitution. It already scheduled visits to Orange, Miami-Dade and Palm Beach Counties.

A powerful panel that has the power to alter the Florida Constitution is getting down to work.

 

The Florida Constitution Revision Commission is holding its first meeting on Monday.

The 37-member panel meets every 20 years and is allowed to propose changes to the state constitution. The commission's amendments will go before voters during the 2018 election.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott appointed Carlos Beruff, a Manatee County homebuilder as chairman. Beruff challenged U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio in last year's election.

Florida Governor Rick Scott is naming Carlos Beruff to chair Florida’s Constitutional Revision Commission.

State lawmakers want to make it harder for Floridians to amend the constitution. The plan would up the percentage of voter approval needed to pass a measure from 60 percent to more than 66 percent.

Miami Herald

Two former state senators, the president of The Florida Bar and a defender of former Gov. Jeb Bush's education legacy were among those named to the Constitution Revision Commission by Senate President Joe Negron, R-Stuart, on Wednesday.

In an interview with The News Service of Florida, Negron said that he hoped the commission, charged with coming up with proposed amendments to the constitution for voters to consider, will focus on a handful of issues ranging from education to redistricting.

Every 20 years, 37 Floridians from all walks of life have a chance to make history. That chance is coming up within a few months and there are still some openings on the panel.

Pages