flooding

Christine DiMattei

In the program room of the Boynton Beach City Library, 80-year-old Harvey Levine is handed a numbered ticket and a form to fill out. He then sits down and waits for his number to be called.

The room is divided into stations marked "Property Look-up," "Insurance Information,"  "Appeals and Comments,"  and "Community Assistance." This is one of several public open houses hosted by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Levine is here to learn the status of his Lake Worth condo.

freedigitalphotos.net

Yesterday, the Miami-Dade Sea Level Rise Task Force released a report detailing six recommendations to the county. 

The main recommendation calls on county officials to consult experts to create an infrastructure that can adapt to rising sea levels. 

Jim Murley is the executive director of the South Florida Regional Planning Council, and was the vice-chairperson of the task force.

Why Flooding Can't Be Prevented In South Florida

May 30, 2014
the Miami Herald

There's a reason flooding is always a possibility when it storms in South Florida.

"Our flood-control system was built over 60 years ago to handle two million people. We now have almost eight million people," says Gabe Margasak, a public information officer for the South Florida Water Management District.

Because of this, in the past six years the District spent about $270 million in upgrades. 

Christine DiMattei

Help is on the way for people whose homes and businesses were damaged by the freak flash floods that hit parts of Palm Beach County in January.

The U.S. Small Business Administration has set up a disaster recovery center in Delray Beach where flood victims can apply for low-interest loans.

Palm Beach County Emergency Operations Center

The flooding left behind by heavy overnight rainfall in parts of Palm Beach County is more than just a nuisance that closed schools and blocked roads.

Now, it has caused two deaths.

The Palm Beach Post reports that a 56-year-old woman drowned after accidently driving her car from a flooded street straight into a canal.  A 90-year-old man died after he fell into a canal while out for a walk. 

Documenting Evidence Of Climate Change

Jul 11, 2013
Charles Trainor Jr. / Miami Herald

For South Florida, climate change isn't part of some vague future; it's a reality today.  South Florida has seen nine inches of of sea-level rise since the 1920s.

maxstrz / Flickr Creative Commons

If sea level rise continues unabated, sections of South Florida -- and Miami in particular -- will be under water in a matter of decades. But a new study suggests that swift reductions in "short-lived climate pollutants" and carbon dioxide levels could help to slow the rise.  

Climate Change Signs Abound, Locals Say

Nov 30, 2012
James Lowry

With its low-level waterfront communities, South Florida is particularly vulnerable to climate change. 

But perhaps no area is more vulnerable than the Florida Keys.

James from Cudjoe Key tells us that a nature trail he has walked for 10 years is now regularly flooded, even at low tide.  Here is a photo he sent us:

While much has been written about the danger to South Florida caused by rising water levels, Pamela from Miami points out that Miami should pay attention to its air: