family separation

A federal judge in California has temporarily halted the deportation of immigrant families that have been reunited after being separated by the Trump administration.

The order was issued Monday by Judge Dana Sabraw, the same judge who previously ordered the government to reunite the families.

It comes as the Trump administration is scrambling to reunite roughly 2,550 immigrant children with their parents by the court-imposed deadline of July 26. What will happen to those families after reunification isn't clear.

Many of President Trump's immigration policies are deeply unpopular, including recent efforts to deter illegal immigration by separating migrant families at the border, according to a new NPR-Ipsos poll.

But Americans are polarized in their attitudes about immigrants and the U.S. system for admitting them, the polls shows, with Republicans much more likely to support the president's policies, including the travel ban, the border wall, and changes to legal immigration.

When it comes to immigration policy, American opinions often break down along party lines, with most Republicans supporting President Trump's views and Democrats vigorously opposed.

But according to a new NPR-Ipsos poll, there is an even better predictor of how you feel about immigration: where you get your TV news.

Across the country, lawyers and advocates are working with U.S. government officials to reunite parents and children who were separated at the U.S.-Mexico border. Over half of the children under the age of five were reunited this past week. Thousands more face a court-ordered deadline for reunification by the end of this month.

Taylor Levy is the legal coordinator for Annunciation House, a migrant shelter in El Paso, Texas. She and her team are trying to help about 50 parents reunite with their children.

Updated at 12:15 a.m. ET on Friday

On Thursday, two days after its original deadline, the Trump administration announced that it has complied with the first part of a court order to return the nearly 3,000 migrant children separated from their parents in recent months.

Ellis Rua / Miami Herald

Thousands of attorneys across the nation have been working for weeks to help children who were separated from their parents due to the Trump Administration’s now-scaled-back “zero tolerance policy” on illegal border crossings.

Sara B. Herald of the Miami-based law firm Bilzin Sumberg says those groups have been overwhelmed by the case loads. That's why Bilzin Sumberg and other firms around the country are stepping forward to help.

When President Trump signed the executive order last month that ended the separation of migrant families, he effectively swapped one controversial practice for another — in this case, the indefinite detention of whole families.

Of the nearly 3,000 migrant minors who were separated from their parents and placed in federal custody, the Trump administration says at least 102 are under 5 years old. And for several weeks, administration officials have been under a court-ordered deadline: Reunite those young children with their parents, and do it quickly.

His name is Johan.

He drank a bottle of milk and played with a purple ball as he waited for the immigration judge, The Associated Press reported.

John W. Richardson, the judge at the Phoenix courthouse, said he was "embarrassed to ask" if the defendant understood the proceedings. "I don't know who you would explain it to, unless you think that a 1-year-old could learn immigration law," he told Johan's attorney.

Updated 10:20 p.m. ET

The Trump administration is asking a federal judge for an extension of the deadline set to reunify all of the migrant parents who were separated from their children at the U.S.-Mexico border.

In a court hearing Friday, U.S. District Judge Dana M. Sabraw delayed until at least Monday any decision on the government's request and he ordered the government to provide a complete list of the reunification status of 101 children under the age of 5 who have been separated from their parents.

Activists in two separate protests against the Trump administration's immigration policies were arrested at the Statue of Liberty on Wednesday — one group unfurling a banner calling for the abolition of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, while in another act of defiance, a woman climbed the statue's base to protest immigrant family separations.

Carl Juste

Pedro Godinez-Aguilar clenched his 7-year-old daughter’s delicate palms in his calloused hands.

Just moments before, the sobbing father braided his “princess’ “ long black hair, cleansed her sweaty skin with crinkled baby wipes, and prayed over her “journey” — a journey that would soon end with him in jail and his daughter more than a thousand miles away.

Daniel Rivero / WLRN News

Hundreds of protesters gathered in downtown Miami on Saturday as part of a protest against the Trump Administration's immigration policies, joining hundreds of other cities across the nation.

Thousands of protesters gathered in major cities and small towns across the country to denounce President Trump's immigration policies at the "Families Belong Together" march.

NPR's Angela Hsieh shared her observations from the rally in Washington, D.C. Saturday.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The protest crowds started convening in Lafayette Square on Saturday morning for Washington, D.C.'s "Families Belong Together" rally.

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