Facebook

The messaging service WhatsApp is changing its privacy policy for the first time since being bought by Facebook in 2014. The app will begin sharing some of its data and phone numbers with the social network. It will also start testing how businesses, too, can talk to its users, for instance by offering flight or shipping or banking notifications.

Baltimore County police shot and killed Korryn Gaines, a 23-year-old black woman, after an hours-long standoff on Monday — during which Facebook and Instagram, at police request, temporarily shut down Gaines' accounts.

It used to be that if you wanted to watch a surgery, you had to sit in a gallery behind a glass panel. And even then, you usually had to be a medical student. The surgeon performed on the other side, but there was no interaction between the doctor and spectators.

Facebook recently announced it will be making  new changes to its mythical algorithm,  the formula that decides what postings you see in your timeline. According to the company, it will give emphasis to content published by "friends and family" over content published by news organizations and pages that you like. 

In practice, this means that the average user will miss valuable news updates and other content produced by news organizations and other pages.

When someone tags you in a photo on Facebook, it's often a nice reminder of a shared memory. It lets your whole social network see what you've been up to or where you've been.

Well, to three men from Illinois, this feature takes on a much more sinister capacity. They argue that when someone tags you in a photo on Facebook without your consent, Facebook is breaking the law — and a federal judge has allowed the case to proceed.

"I'm going to prison or death sentence for killing my wife. Love you guys. Miss you guys. Take care. Facebook people you'll see me in the news."

The Miami Herald and other news outlets are reporting that 31-year-old Derek Medina of South Miami apparently posted that Facebook message Thursday morning, along with a photo of a woman's "twisted, bloodied body lying on a linoleum floor."

State Archives of Florida / Florida Memory, floridamemory.com/items/show/163687

I’m a Northern California boy, through and through. I grew up ten minutes north of Berkeley, went to college at Davis, about forty five minutes away, and then was fortunate enough to have the industry I went to school for bloom around me. I spent my post-university career living around the Bay Area, the last four years in the Mission in San Francisco. I am attuned to things that are uniquely San Francisco: burritos, surly Asian women serving me pho, co-workers into fringe politics, passive-aggressiveness.

I could hardly believe what I was looking at. There it was, star­ing right at me. I could no longer ignore, deny, or post-rationalize what I already knew as the dig­i­tal evi­dence stared me down and waved its mer­ci­less accusatory fin­ger at me. This marked the end of the line for me, three months ago to the day.

 

The other day I got an e-mail that was signed “Brgrds.” Brgrds?? What does that mean? Oh. Right. “Best Regards.” So, why on earth the author didn't just take the extra three (?) seconds and five key strokes to actually write the words “Best Regards,” I have no idea, but it was a big “aha!” moment for me.