Express Lanes

The End of the Road
7:31 am
Mon September 29, 2014

Inside "Florida's Toll Lane Boom"

95 Express was Florida's first dynamic tolling system but it will not be the last.
Credit FDOT

As part of our End of the Road series, we’ve reported extensively on the so-called “Lexus Lanes” on I-95. In the 95 express lanes drivers can pay a toll to get around regular gridlock traffic. That toll varies based on how many car are piling into the express lanes at that moment. The more demand, the higher the toll -- to keep things moving.

The lanes were the first of their kind in Florida, but a new report from the Florida Center for Investigative Reporting says 95 Express is the future for Florida’s highways.

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The End of the Road
3:26 pm
Tue February 18, 2014

FHP's Operation I-95 Saturation Yields More Than 400 Citations

Credit Photo by Kenny Malone

The Florida Highway Patrol issued more than eight citations per hour during Operation I-95 Saturation last week.

In response to public complaints about a lack of enforcement on 95 in Miami-Dade County, FHP roughly doubled its enforcement Monday through Friday from 6 a.m. to 4 p.m., expanding the hours from the originally planned 10-to-4 timeframe.

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The End of the Road
7:46 am
Mon February 3, 2014

I-95's Narrow Shoulders And Speeding Cars Problematic For FHP

Credit By Jeffrey Katz, courtesy FDOT

The 95 Express Project has gotten traffic moving. Sometimes, arguably, moving too well.

FDOT numbers show that the average speed of express lane traffic during the majority of the day is between 64 and 66 MPH. That means the “average” car during those times is speeding by as much as 11 MPH.

The speed limit, which is the same for both the express lanes and the general purpose lanes, is either 55 MPH or 60 MPH depending on where you are.

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The End of the Road
10:58 pm
Sun January 19, 2014

Buses: The Future Of Transportation In South Florida

Ridership on 95 Express buses from Golden Glades has increased about 50 percent in the last few years.
Credit Kenny Malone / WLRN

Behold the future, South Florida.

Commuter Mary Hammett rides a transport module that zips down what many call “I-95.” It moves faster than most cars. Hammett relaxes in the back and pulls out her iPhone, which automatically logs in to the module’s WiFi network.

She taps open the Pandora app and gives the James Fortune station a thumbs up -- a 'like' button on the little screen. As Hammett travels to her downtown Miami office, it's all smooth sailing and silky gospel vocals.

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