execution

Florida Department of Corrections

Florida’s lethal injection procedure is constitutional according to a decision out Monday from the U.S. Supreme Court, the final day of decisions for this term.

The Glossip case challenged the use of one drug in the lethal injection procedure in Oklahoma, but Florida is the only other state that uses virtually the same means to execute death row inmates.

 

Florida Department of Corrections

Over the last several years, European drug manufacturers have tried to limit the use of their products in lethal injection executions. As a result, death penalty states were left scrambling to find replacements.

In 2013, Florida began using a new drug called midazolam that is now the subject of a U.S. Supreme Court case: Glossip v. Gross. The state, which has one of the most active active death chambers, has halted all executions for the past six months awaiting a decision on the case.

Creative Commons via Flickr / Pete Jordan (https://flic.kr/p/c3STn3)

This year, the U.S. Supreme Court has taken on a litany of big cases with far-reaching implications especially for Floridians. Here are some things you need to know about how several upcoming decisions will affect the Sunshine State.

Florida Department of Corrections

UPDATE 6/19/2014 -- John Henry's execution was temporarily delayed waiting for a last-minute appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court which was denied. Henry was pronounced dead at 7:43pm.

Eddie Davis is the next person scheduled to be executed in the state. That will take place on July 10th.

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Florida is on track to execute its first inmate since the flawed and controversial execution in Oklahoma that led to an inmate’s heart attack.

01/29/14 Wednesday's Topical Currents is with Texas attorney David Dow, who’s defended some 100 death row inmates and witnessed many executions.  He says he knows some were innocent.  He’s written a book which considers death philosophically, but not just by execution.  Is it better to anticipate one’s death and prepare for it?  Or is it better to go quickly, quietly, without warning?