Everglades National Park

Miami Herald

When you think of oil production in the U.S., it's perhaps along with images of oil wells in Texas or North Dakota, maybe Alaska. It's not something associated with travel logs of Florida.

Yet, there is oil drilling in the Sunshine State -- about 2 million barrels a year. And that is truly a drop in the bucket compared to the total amount of oil consumed in this country on a daily basis.

Emma_L_M/flickr

UPDATE, Aug. 3, 4:30 p.m.: The South Florida Management District board reversed its decision against tax cuts.

The board held a special meeting on Friday, July 31, where they approved to cut a property tax rate for the fifth year in a row.

Two weeks ago, the board voted 6-2 to maintain the tax rate that would’ve prevented having to rely on the agency’s reserves.

The final vote on the proposed budget will take place in September.

Balthazira / Flickr Creative Commons

A South Florida company is asking for permission to explore the Everglades west of Broward for oil. Environmentalists say it's a bad idea and some experts argue that there isn't enough oil in Florida to make it worth the effort. 

Everglades Bike Path: Yea Or Nay?

Jul 14, 2015
JaxStrong / Flickr via https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/

The window for public comment on the latest Everglades tourism project is closing soon. The controversial River of Grass Greenway (ROGG) would be a 75-mile bike path running along U.S. 41 from Naples to Miami.

Ebony Joseph / WLRN

Dozens of activists met outside Miami-Dade County's Stephen P. Clark Center chanting and carrying banners with phrases like “Neverglades or Foreverglades.”  They marched in protest of the River of Grass Greenway (ROGG), a roughly 75-mile bike path planned to run from Naples to Miami alongside the Tamiami Trail (US 41).

The project was proposed in 2006 by a group of cyclists from Naples. In 2010, the National Park Service took a one million dollar federal grant to develop the trail.

Richard Riley via Flickr / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Every harvest season, sugar farmers in Florida light controlled fires to burn off the leaves on the sugar cane plant. Only the stalks remain, waiting to be cut down, transported to mills and refined into sugar.

The Sierra Club says the practice is outdated and harmful to public health. The group’s Florida branch recently hosted a Big Sugar Summit in West Palm Beach to call for an end to cane burning.

Daniel Ducassi

President Barack Obama visited the Everglades last week to commemorate Earth Day and to talk about the risks climate change poses to South Florida, the nation, and the world. 

"If we don't act, there may not be an Everglades as we know it," the president said.

The president also used the opportunity to chide Governor Rick Scott for his administration’s unofficial ban of the phrase "climate change."

Creative Commons via Flickr / Erik Cleves Kristensen (https://flic.kr/p/puLn7s)

In a new report from the National Park Service, almost 3 million people walked, boated, bird-watched or were dragged by a parent to one of the four national parks and reserves in South Florida: Big Cypress, Biscayne National, Dry Tortugas and Everglades.

Lisann Ramos

Last November Florida voters passed an amendment that allocated billions in state funds in the course of 20 years for land conservation.

Now environmental groups are urging Florida lawmakers to buy a huge swath of land from U.S. Sugar for Everglades conservation. The plan would store and clean excess water from the lake on the purchased land that would eventually flow down to Everglades National Park.

Flickr/CreativeCommons/Bruce Tuten

 

How’d you like to become a citizen scientist and help conservation efforts in the Everglades?

Every other Saturday from Jan. 3, 2015 until late March, Everglades National Park will host its Big Day Birding Adventure.

Novice and experienced birders alike will be asked to spend the day counting birds within the varied habitats of the park -- from freshwater marsh to mangrove swamp.

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