environment

Environment
10:35 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Everglades Restoration: Water And Money Flow Into The River Of Grass

Everglades restoration received a sizable cash infusion this week.
Credit Balthazira / Flickr Creative Commons

May was an eventful -- and most would likely say hopeful -- month for the beleaguered Everglades. Gov. Rick Scott signed into law new legislation that will provide hundreds of millions of dollars over the next decade to fund Everglades restoration and cleanup.

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Biking
6:02 am
Thu May 23, 2013

The Environmental Cost Of South Florida's Car Culture Could Be Negated By Bikes

Bicycling and the environment have a close relationship in South Florida.
Credit Daniel Oines / Flickr Creative Commons

In a state that is noted for its dedicated car culture, it seems a given that residents and tourists would benefit from any measurable decrease in road congestion, car exhaust, and air pollution. As National Bike Month winds down and South Florida, communities make moves to become more bike friendly, it pays to talk about the potential environmental impact of having more bicycles and less cars on Florida's roads. 

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Local Food
8:51 am
Tue May 21, 2013

Lutherans Help Urban Farm Take Root In Fort Lauderdale

Artist rendering of the proposed Flagler Village Community Garden in Fort Lauderdale.
Credit flaglergarden.org

Like many young professionals, 30-year-old Chad Scott had second thoughts about his job.

He was a CPA with accounting giant Ernest & Young for more than six years before becoming an internal auditor with Miami-based Burger King International. But something was missing.

"I wanted a life I could live without anxiety," said the Pembroke Pines native, recalling all the times he was chained to a desk during tax season and wouldn't see the sun for days.

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Climate Change
6:00 am
Thu May 16, 2013

Broward County Mayor Leads Local Response To Sea Level Rise

Broward County Mayor Kristin Jacobs
Credit twitter.com/Kristin_Jacobs

Even before last year's coastal calamity caused by superstorm Sandy, Broward County Mayor Kristin Jacobs was trying to get everyone's attention about sea-level rise and it's impact on South Florida.

She's one of the founding members of the Southeast Florida Regional Climate Change Compact, a multi-county effort to help local governments plan ahead. Jacobs is a longtime county commissioner serving a second one-year term as mayor, a largely ceremonial role.

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Environment
2:16 pm
Tue May 14, 2013

Why The 'World's Weirdest Bird' Is Ditching South Florida And Heading North

Roseate spoonbills are increasingly ditching South Florida for points north.
Credit Patdaversa / Flickr Creative Commons

The roseate spoonbill -- often mistaken by confused tourists for the non-native flamingo -- is one of Florida's great iconic species. Dubbed "one of the most breathtaking of the world's weirdest birds" by naturalist Roger Tory Peterson, the gangly creatures are an increasingly rare sight in South Florida. 

According to a feature in the May-June issue of Audubon Magazine, spoonbills have been vacating South Florida in droves, heading north to more hospitable (read: often less developed) lands.

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Food
10:34 am
Wed April 24, 2013

Coffee For A Cause: What Do Those Feel-Good Labels Deliver?

Luis Fernando Vasquez has been a coffee farmer in the central valley of Costa Rica his entire life.
Dan Charles NPR

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 3:50 pm

What does it take to find guilt-free coffee?

Much of our coffee comes from places where the environment is endangered and workers earn very little — sometimes, just a few dollars for a whole day's work. Coffee farmers have helped cut down tropical forests, and most of them use pesticides.

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Topical Currents
1:00 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

The History and Promise of Green Technology

Alexis Madrigal
https://twitter.com/alexismadrigal

04/22/13 - Monday’s Topical Currents looks at environmental technology with the author of POWERING THE DREAM:  The History and Promise of Green Technology.  Energy innovation began in earnest some 150 years ago.  Geo-thermal heating was used in Idaho in 1892, while windmills irrigated the Great Plains and watered livestock.

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Miami Dish
11:13 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Earth Day At The Restaurant: Miami Chefs Weigh In On How Pro Kitchens Can Go Green

Credit Michael Lorenzo / stock.xchang

As today is Earth Day, a few Miami chefs chimed in on how they try to reduce waste or recycle at their restaurants.

Jen Chaefsky, owner and general manager of Macchialina:

“Our water glasses are made out of recycled wine bottles. It’s something small, but every little bit helps; plus it’s a cool element that guests love to learn about.”

Sam Gorenstein, chef and owner of My Ceviche:

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Earth Day
3:30 pm
Fri April 19, 2013

Student Eco Film Comes Full Circle Via Miami Nature Center

Bertha Vazquez

“When you contaminate the water, you contaminate yourself,” explains science teacher Bertha Vazquez to her students at Miami’s George Washington Carver Middle School. “You’re part of an ecosystem.”

Since 1991, Vazquez has taught students what they can do to save the planet through an integrated curriculum that weaves together science, human behavior and facts about climate change.

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Town Hall 2013 Environmental Issues
11:07 am
Tue February 26, 2013

Environment Back On The Table This Legislative Session, Says Senate Majority Leader

Wildlife viewing is popular with Florida residents and tourists, making Everglades restoration and environmental protection a matter of economic concern.
Credit toki-doki / Flickr Creative Commons

Tough economic times put environmental issues on the Florida Legislature's back burner in recent years, but this session should be different, according to Sen. Jack Latvala (R-Clearwater), who sat on the panel at Monday night's Town Hall Session 2013 hosted by WLRN and the Miami Herald

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The Art Of Science
12:00 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

Three Miami Thinkers Take On Beavers At The End Of The World

A group of Miami-based artists and scientists went to Tierra del Fuego as part of Ensayos, a multi-disciplinary research project.
Photo by Melissa Memory

In 1946, a bizarre cargo shipment stopped over at the Pan American Airlines headquarters in Miami. En route to Tierra del Fuego, the southern most tip of South America, fifty North American Beavers were temporarily housed in a walk-in refrigerator maintained by the airline. The door of the fridge, however, was made of wood.

This is oversight at its worst; Beavers in a prison made of wood.

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Environment
6:47 am
Mon January 14, 2013

Fearing Underwater 'Silent Spring,' NOAA Seeks Public Comment On Coral Decline

Credit FlickR/mattk1979

Corals are not as visible as panthers, manatees or dolphins.  But scientists say they deserve just as much protection -- and respect -- as other animals beloved by Floridians. 

The National Marine Fisheries Service has proposed extending federal protection to 66 species of coral, including seven local species that scientists say are nearing extinction.

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Photography
11:28 am
Wed January 9, 2013

Bird Photos That Defy Time And Space

Blue-Throated Hummingbird, Chiricahua Mountains, Arizona, May 1959
Eliot Porter

Originally published on Tue January 8, 2013 12:04 pm

According to legend, when asked "Why birds?" photographer Eliot Porter replied as if it were obvious: "Because they fly."

But wait! Don't dismiss these as "bird photos." First, it helps to know just how difficult it is to capture a bird in flight — especially on film. It's also good to know how special it was to be photographing in color in the 1940s, and how onerous it is to make one's own dye-transfer prints.

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Environment
2:00 pm
Tue January 8, 2013

Why Wading Birds Are Getting A Little Less Busy In The Everglades

Nesting numbers of wading birds are considered an important measure of the health of the overall system.
Credit Vlabed/Flickr

Breeding numbers were down for some bird species for the third straight year in a row in the Everglades.

Nesting numbers for wading birds fell by 38 percent compared to the past decade. That's according to an annual survey compiled by the South Florida Water Management District.

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Environment
7:00 am
Tue January 8, 2013

Why The Everglades National Park Is Handing Out Anti-Vulture Kits

Black vultures sometimes rip the rubber and vinyl parts off of cars.
Credit Brian Henderson/Flickr

Next time you go to the Everglades you'll have the option to pick up an anti-vulture kit.

The park is offering the kits so people can protect their cars against vultures during the winter months. The black vultures sometimes rip the rubber and vinyl parts--such as windshield wipers and sunroof seals--off of cars.

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