environment

Creative Commons / Photo: Flickr user David Trawin

  While sunscreen is essential in protecting South Florida beach goers' skin, a new study from the Spanish National Research Council shows the skin protectant might also be killing off life in the ocean.

The study focuses on an aspect of sunscreens rarely looked at for its environmental impact: the nano-particles that block ultraviolet rays from baking our skin, including titanium dioxide and zinc oxide. Those chemicals can be found in sunscreens available at any corner drugstore.

Gina Jordan/WLRN

Gov. Rick Scott sat down for half an hour this week with climate scientists who want him to take immediate action to deal with climate change.

A few of those same scientists took their message to the Internet Thursday.

Florida Inspectors Say Miami Port Dredging Hurts Sea Life

Aug 20, 2014
Florida Department of Environmental Protection

The $205 million dredge project to deepen PortMiami has spread a blanket of silt and clay over the bay bottom that is smothering coral and damaging sea life, state environmental inspectors have found.

In a letter Monday, the state Department of Environmental Protection warned the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which is managing the project, that work is violating state permits, churning up too much sediment and having a “profound effect” on the sea floor. The agency gave the Corps two weeks to respond.

Florida House of Representatives / floridaredistricting.org

    

  This week on the Florida Roundup: Florida lawmakers race the clock to fix voting maps recently ruled unconstitutional. What could this mean for Sunshine State voters heading into the 2014 Elections?

Join guest host Christine DiMattei and a panel of the region’s top journalists for a conversation about how redistricting impacts Florida voters.

Some of the other stories we’ll be addressing:

NOAA/TetraTech

For the last two months, marine restoration teams have been hauling up coffee table-like structures from Florida Keys waters. They're called casitas -- Spanish for "little houses."

Cute name -- but the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says these things can be really nasty. They're made out of a wide variety of materials, including corrugated tin, plastic and cement.

When lobsters seek shelter under the artificial habitats, poachers can catch as many as 1,500 a day, far exceedng the daily catch limit of 250.

Rasmus Bøgeskov Larsen / Flickr Creative Commons

The impact of sea-level rise on South Florida will be the topic of discussion at the Second Annual Sea Level Rise Symposium Friday.

Experts say Florida is ground zero for sea level rise, and the Southeast Florida region will be the most impacted.

Tara Bardi, senior scientist with the Arthur R. Marshall Foundation for the Everglades, says even with increased media coverage on sea-level rise, most people aren’t sure how it will impact them personally.

Carla Javier/WLRN

Gov. Rick Scott has been repeatedly quoted as saying "I'm not a scientist" when asked whether he believes in man-made climate change.

Dan Kipnis / Biscayne Bay Waterkeeper

An environmental non-profit organization has filed a letter that says it may sue the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.  

Biscayne Bay Waterkeeper in Miami alleges the Army Corps violated the Endangered Species Act by not protecting coral reefs affected by dredging at PortMiami.

Wikimedia / Creative Commons

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has a controversial history in Florida -- especially when it comes to the Everglades and the state’s wildlife.  

But now, the agency wants Floridians to know they’re working harder to protect endangered species.  

Each year the Corps of Engineers receives requests for various projects to build on regulated wetlands or the coast.  

The agency tries to issue half of those permits within 120 days.

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

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