environment

Citing Student Safety, FIU Wants To Open Access Road Through A Nature Preserve

Mar 4, 2018
Handout Scott Galvin

Florida International University's sprawling Biscayne Bay Campus has one serious problem, President Mark Rosenberg said— there's only one way in and one way out. And complicating the issue, he said: There are three public schools on the only access road that adds to the traffic.

“We are sitting on a very dangerous situation,” he said Sunday, referring to what would happen if there is an emergency situation and people had to evacuate along 151st Street. “My highest priority is student safety.”

Kate Stein / WLRN

Palm Beach County's prized natural areas -- protected areas of dunes, wetlands, scrub and flatwood forests -- could lose money for maintenance in the next few years because of changes to funding sources.

Mark Hedden / markhedden.com

Is there anything more Floridian than a flamingo?

They’re everywhere. Pink plastic ornaments dotting lawns. On cocktail swizzlers and motel signs.

Real, live Flamingos occasionally show up in the Everglades. A couple years ago a big flock showed up in a Palm Beach County stormwater treatment area. But the official story is that these birds don't belong here. That Florida's flamingos were all hunted out of existence back in the 19th century.

Urban Wetlands To Clean Polluted Storm Water

Feb 14, 2018
Tom Hudson / WLRN

Every time it rains, storm water drains throughout South Florida pick up a slick admixture of gasoline, soot, detergent, fertilizers and other contaminants as the runoff flows through the human-dominated landscape. 

The state’s highest court will not weigh in on Floridians’ right to front yard vegetable gardens. But the food fight isn’t over in the state capital. 

Mac Stone Photography

Wood storks, roseate spoonbills, ibises and egrets are among the many birds that fly, paddle and wade through the Everglades.

They draw visitors, particularly photographers, to the ecosystem. But the Everglades' birds are important for another reason: The health of wading bird communities says a lot about progress on Everglades restoration.

Paul Lamison / AP

Florida wildlife officials say a red tide bloom persists along the southwest Florida coast and some fish kills have been reported.

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission says the organism responsible for red tides is a natural part of the ecosystem but it can bloom to high concentrations when conditions favor it. Over the past week, samples were collected offshore in Collier, Lee, Hillsborough, Sarasota, Charlotte and Monroe counties.

Kate Stein / WLRN

Scientists have long known that climate change is threatening the Everglades. But outdoor enthusiasts and environmental advocates have often looked at the two as separate issues.

WLRN

Floridians have until March 9 to comment on President Donald Trump's draft proposal program that would allow for offshore drilling and seismic testing off the state's coasts.

Activists will be protesting and gathering comments to submit to the administration in Miami Beach on Sunday at CoastFest, an educational event hosted by Oceana, a non-profit organization that focuses on protecting the world's oceans.

 

Elected officials, business leaders and scientists will join to speak on the impacts of offshore drilling and seismic testing.

Ocearch

George, a great white shark that was nearly 10 feet long and weighed more than 700 pounds when he was tagged a year ago off Nantucket, has paid a visit to Everglades National Park.

At about 5 p.m. Sunday, a satellite tracker picked up the shark when he surfaced off Highland Beach, a remote campsite in the park’s Marjory Stoneman Douglas Wilderness Trail on the southwest coast. It’s the second time the shark has been located close to shore. While tracking can be imprecise, a third inshore ping could provide insight into whether George is becoming a regular Florida tourist.

Emily Michot / Miami Herald

The last couple of years have not been kind to the endangered Key deer.

Leonardo Sagnotti / via Flickr

If you own a house in South Florida, you might want to start thinking hard about sea level rise.

The ocean here could rise a foot or more in the next 30 years -- the amount of time in a mortgage cycle -- according to University of Miami professor Harold Wanless and other researchers.  That means if you buy a house today, and rising seas put your house at risk for flooding, your property value might decrease... but your mortgage payments won’t.

WINDSOR JOHNSON / NPR

South Florida could see two feet or more of sea level rise in the next forty years, according to a joint projection by Palm Beach, Broward, Miami-Dade and Monroe counties.

A federal wildlife refuge north of the Everglades is setting traps for pythons to protect against the voracious invasive snake.

Climate change is forcing people in the Florida Keys to spend millions of dollars to raise some of their roads as sea levels rise.

Pages