environment

One of the scientists who spoke with Governor Rick Scott about climate change watched election results from the party for losing candidate Charlie Crist.

Eckerd College marine science professor David Hastings said when he and four other scientists met with Scott in August, the governor didn’t react much to his concerns about rising sea levels. But Scott told him he was open to fixing some of the problems.

Emma_L_M/flickr

Florida voters will decide whether environmental preservation becomes part of the state Constitution. Amendment 1 is a citizens’ initiative born from nearly a million petition signatures.

Owen Byrne / Flickr Creative Commons

Miami city commissioners are trying to figure out a citywide anti-poverty plan and how they would fund the program.

Two months ago, at the urging of Commissioner Keon Hardemon, the city set aside $1.2 million into a poverty trust during its budget process. Hardemon represents the most impoverished district in the city which includes Overtown, Liberty City and Little Haiti.

On Friday morning, Hardemon, Commisioners Francis Suarez and Marc Sarnoff and about a dozen city staff members took part in a roundtable discussion about an anti-poverty strategy.

Look Up! It's Turkey Vulture Time In South Florida

Oct 13, 2014
Shawn Carey / Courtesy of Keith Bildstein

We may not get the brilliant reds and yellows of leaves changing to signal a switch of season in South Florida, but there is, without question, a definite visual cue that autumn has arrived in the lowest of the lower 48.

All you have to do is look up.

In the air, circling and gliding, dipping and soaring, hopping on a thermal current for a rollercoaster ride, are the turkey vultures.

http://www.fsec.ucf.edu/en/ / Florida Solar Energy Center

A coalition of energy partners has published a census of renewable energy jobs in Florida.

The coalition includes: the Florida Alliance for Renewable Energy, the Florida Chapter of Energy Services Coalition and Environmental Entrepreneurs or E2, an affiliate of the Natural Resources Defense Council.

A wave of high tides is expected to hit much of the East Coast this week. These special tides — king tides — occur a few times a year when the moon's orbit brings it close to the Earth.

But scientists say that lately, even normal tides throughout the year are pushing water higher up onto land. And that's causing headaches for people who live along coastlines.

As Bob Dylan might have put it, the tides, they are a changin'.

David Burdick/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

National, state and local leaders recently gathered in South Florida to discuss climate change at the Southeast Florida Climate Leadership Summit Program. Mike Boots, director of the White House Council on Environmental Quality, was the keynote speaker.

Boots is also chair of a new task force on climate preparedness. While he was here, he toured parts of South Florida to see firsthand what could be ground zero for issues like sea-level rise.

Below is an edited version of our conversation.

What are the real threats of climate change to this region?

If you missed the total eclipse of the moon in April, you might have another chance: On Wednesday morning, the second of four lunar eclipses this year and next will occur.

Southeast Florida Regional Compact

Absorbing the material at the sixth annual Climate Leadership Summit was a lot like trying to drink from a fire hose. There was a lot of information, much of it technical, dense and very detailed.

The two-day event was a series of expert deep dives into hydrology and re-insurance and risk management.

If there is an iconic bird for the Florida Keys, the Key West quail-dove is it. The bird was named, and painted, by John James Audubon during his 1832 visit to the island chain.

"I have taken upon myself to name this species the Key West pigeon, and offer it as a tribute to the generous inhabitants of that island, who favoured me with their friendship," Audubon wrote in his journal.

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